Please select your home edition
Edition
GJW 2018 728x90
Product Feature
Seldén PBB60 FIDDLE/BECKET, CAM BLOCK
Seldén PBB60 FIDDLE/BECKET, CAM BLOCK
Boat Insurance from Noble Marine


Full racing risks
New for old cover
www.noblemarine.co.uk

2019 Mini-Transat La Boulangère - Day 9

by Aurélie Bargat 13 Oct 23:54 BST 13 October 2019
2019 Mini-Transat La Boulangère © Christophe Breschi

The denouement of the first leg of the Mini-Transat La Boulangère is imminent in the prototype category! At 15:00 UTC this Sunday, François Jambou was just 30 miles from the finish in Las Palmas de Gran Canaria. Tanguy Bouroullec and Axel Tréhin were respectively 15 and 25 miles shy of the leader.

François Jambou is expected on the finish line from 19:00 UTC. This estimate is subject to change given the very light wind conditions reigning over the Canaries. To follow this three-way match race up close, the cartography (www.minitransat.fr/en/follow-race/cartography) is now updating every hour. In the production boat category, victory is likely to be played out between Ambrogio Beccaria and Félix de Navacelle. At 15:00 UTC, Ambrogio was leading the way some 80 miles from the finish. The podium for the production boats should be revealed tomorrow, Monday.

This was not really the scenario that the favourites in the prototype category had envisaged when they set sail from La Rochelle on Saturday 2 October. François Jambou, Tanguy Bouroullec, Axel Tréhin and the others were expecting a very quick race and the routing was promising. However, experienced sailors as they are, they knew only too well that it certainly wasn't a done deal.

Denouement this evening (or tonight?) in the prototype category

The 1,350 miles leading to Las Palmas have been complex and punctuated by a wide range of weather conditions that have really put the sailors to the test. The finale in light airs is doubtless especially demanding. François Jambou, Tanguy Bouroullec and Axel Tréhin will be the first to tell all on the pontoons in Las Palmas. At 15:00 UTC, François Jambou seemed well placed to take the win, just 30 miles from the finish line and racking up about 5 knots of boat speed. He might well cross the line at around 19:00 UTC, that is unless the wind drops right away off Las Palmas turning the last few miles into a very hard slog, made all the harder by having two of your closest pursuers breathing down your neck.

Verdict tomorrow in the production boat category

Given the light wind conditions, it's hard to go by the routing and establish a precise ETA for the different skippers. In the production boat category, we'll very likely discover the podium winners in the second half of the day. At 15:00 UTC, Ambrogio Beccaria was still leading the fleet, tailed by Félix de Navacelle and Julien Letissier, the latter likely to be pleasantly surprised by his performance in this first leg. Tomorrow, we're expecting a great slew of arrivals as there is a compact group hot on the heels of the top trio.

83 skippers out on the racetrack and some substantial separation

Yesterday evening, following on from the retirement of Czech skipper Pavel Roubal (908), Jonathan Chodkiewiez (958) and Jean-Baptiste Ternon (880), a fourth retirement was announced by Yann Blondel (836), who decided that he didn't have enough time to effect repairs in Leixões near Porto. Indeed, on top of energy issues, he also lost use of his autopilot and had a broken rudder pintle.

Lamenting some technical issues but not planning a pit stop at this stage are Guillaume Coupé (906), who hit a whale 3 days ago, causing popping of the structural floor of his boat and movement of the keel. Inevitably the boat has suffered some delamination, which he hopes to repair in the Canaries and, in the meantime, he is not pushing the boat too hard. Spanish sailor Miguel Rondon (954) has no power aboard but is continuing his race. The rudder fitting on the boat skippered by Axelle Pillain (781) has unscrewed itself and cracked so she's strapped it up in a bid to make it safe. As for Thomas Gaschignard (539) and Bruno Simmonet (757), their energy woes are presently resolved thanks to Saturday's sunshine.

Back out on the racetrack at last, Briton Joe Lacey (963) has finally got Cape Finisterre behind him and is making nearly 5 knots en route to the Canaries and David Kremer is making around seven knots in more favourable conditions off the coast of Portugal. Both courageous skippers are sure to be delighted to finally be heading in the right direction after their technical issues...

Ranking on Sunday 13 October at 15:00 UTC: (top three in each division)

Prototype
1- François Jambou (865 - Team BFR Marée Haute Jaune) 30.1 miles from the finish 2- Tanguy Bouroullec (969 - Cerfrance) 15.5 miles behind the leader 3- Axel Tréhin (945 - Project Rescue Ocean) 25.5 miles behind the leader

Production
1- Ambrogio Beccaria (943 - Geomag) 80.1 miles from the finish 2- Félix De Navacelle (916 - Youkounkoun)10.5 miles behind the leader 3- Julien Letissier (869 - Reno Style) 25.1 miles behind the leader

For more information visit minitransat.fr.

Related Articles

Mini-Transat La Boulangère Leg 2 Day 9
A war of nerves and damage galore François Jambou (865) in the prototype category and Ambrogio Beccaria (943) in the production boat fleet are still utterly dominating the competition. Posted on 12 Nov
Mini-Transat La Boulangère Leg 2 Day 9
Ambrogio Beccaria is very well placed to take the win in the production boat category François Jambou is this morning less than 500 miles from the finish in Le Marin in Martinique. As such, the leader in the prototype category now has a glimpse of what looks set to be a victorious finish within the next two days. Posted on 12 Nov
Mini-Transat La Boulangère Leg 2 Day 8
Four days away from the finish? After a little over eight days of racing, the fastest of the fleet have already completed two thirds of the 2,700 miles between Las Palmas de Gran Canaria and Le Marin in Martinique. Posted on 10 Nov
Mini-Transat La Boulangère Leg 2 Day 7
The leaders at the midway mark, Ferré excels François Jambou (865 - Team BFR Marée Haute Jaune) and Ambrogio Beccaria (943 - Geomag), the respective leaders in the Prototype and Production boat category in this 2nd leg of the Mini-Transat La Boulangère 2019, are at the midway mark in the course Posted on 9 Nov
Mini-Transat La Boulangère Leg 2 Day 6
Everyone in the trade winds… Bouroullec in turmoil with technical issues The trio of Jambou, Beccaria, Ferré is continuing its route leaving very little room for tactical error, the whole performance posted at a furious pace (an average of around 10 knots over the past 24 hours). Posted on 7 Nov
Mini-Transat La Boulangère Leg 2 Day 5
Jambou and Beccaria solid leaders Italians Matteo Sericano and Marco Buonanni have both broken a rudder and are making for Mindelo, in Cape Verde, where they'll make a pit stop to effect repairs before, hopefully, returning to the racetrack. Posted on 6 Nov
Mini-Transat La Boulangère Leg 2 Day 4
An epic run towards Martinique! After three days at sea, the fleet of 82 sailors in the second leg of the Mini-Transat La Boulangère is complete once again after Jean Lorre's return to the racetrack at the start of the afternoon. Posted on 5 Nov
TJV drama, Mini Transat update, Paris 2024 updates
Latest Sail-World USA newsletter from David Schmidt If you're an ocean-racing junkie, November can be a thirsty month in North America. Fortunately, this year's fix comes in the form of the biennial Transat Jacques Vabre, which involves doublehanded racing aboard IMOCA 60s, Multi 50s and Class 40s. Posted on 5 Nov
Mini-Transat La Boulangère Leg 2 Day 3
The Atlantic chessboard: Everyone is positioning their pawns With little information and few tools at their disposal, the sailors are having to decide which strategy they believe will pay off in the medium and long term: immediately favouring the West or investing in the South. Posted on 4 Nov
Mini-Transat La Boulangère Leg 2 Day 2
The southern expressway: off like a shot This Sunday, a day on from the start of the second leg of the Mini-Transat La Boulangère, the 81 sailors out on the racetrack are benefiting from trade wind conditions that favour slipping along and long surfs. Posted on 3 Nov