Please select your home edition
Edition
Wessex Resins 2019 - Pro-Set - 728x90

Back to basics boat race sets sail on New Year's Day

by David Ferguson 23 Dec 2018 17:45 GMT 1 January 2019

Whilst most of us nurse hangovers, New Year's Day in Zanzibar sees 22 teams, made up of 66 sailors, set sail in one of the world's most basic, yet exciting, races.

The sixth edition of the Kraken Cup (previously called the Ngalawa Cup) is expected to take around eight days, depending on weather conditions, and winds its way 500km around the coast of Tanzania, between the Zanzibar Archipelago and the stunning Lindi region, taking in some of best sailing in the Indian Ocean.

In the modern age of fibreglass hulls and carbon fibre sails, the Kraken Cup strips things back to basics and really tests the seamanship of sailors, through the use of ngalawas, traditional African fishing boats whose hulls are carved by hand from mango trees and have a couple of outriggers lashed on.

This January's race sees the biggest field to date lining up at the start and has a genuinely international feel to it. The organisers, The Adventurists, are hoping for a close fought race, the last edition being won by The Mast & The Furious, who had Toby Scregg from Britain (the youngest participant in the race) at their helm.

"The last edition of the race was brilliant and saw a really close finish, but with some really quality sailors lined up this year we're expecting a nail-biting race throughout," says Matthew Dickens of The Adventurists.

It's not just sailing experience that will determine the final winners though. The race course is made up of a series of compulsory checkpoints and a couple of 'free-sailing' sections, where sailors will not only have to contend with the challenges of sailing ngalawas but also find somewhere to sleep for the night: roughing it on uninhabited islets, camping on islands with inquisitive locals or staying in a traditional fishing village. Racers are encouraged to 'bring a hammock and a healthy dose of bravery'.

To follow the race, from the comfort of your armchair, head to www.theadventurists.com

Related Articles

French Canadian Team take the spoils in Kraken Cup
One of the World's most adventurous, yet basic, sailing races This week on the 8th January saw Team Village Monde crossing the finish line as winners of the Kraken Cup (sponsored by Garmin) one of the World's most adventurous, yet basic, sailing races. Posted on 10 Jan
Kraken Cup set to start on New Year's Day
Back to basics boat race sets sail Whilst most of us nurse hangovers, New Year's Day in Zanzibar sees 22 teams, made up of 66 sailors, set sail in one of the world's most basic, yet exciting, races. Posted on 28 Dec 2018
Simon Walker set for The Kraken Cup
Offshore sailor take on the challenge of ngalawas sailing Simon Walker has sailed around the world the 'wrong way' twice and was skipper of the Toshiba Wave Warrior in the 1996/7 BT Global Challenge, where he was the youngest skipper in the fleet and finished 2nd. Posted on 28 Apr 2018
Ngalawa Cup 2017
Tanzania to Zanzibar with a mango tree hull Making the Ngalawa Cup stand out from the crowd, and giving it its name, is the fact it takes place in ngalawas, traditional fishing boats whose hulls are carved by hand from mango trees with outriggers lashed on. Posted on 15 Jul 2017
Stripped back race about to set sail
All set for the Ngalawa Cup 2017 On the 27th of June the fifth edition of the Ngalawa Cup sets sails. Snaking around the Zanzibar Archipelago, the Cup is a sailing race for over 300km off the coast of Tanzania. Posted on 25 Jun 2017
Ngalawa Cup 2017
Capsizes, snapped masts and strong currents off Tanzania They capsized, snapped masts, got stuck in currents so strong they were pushed backwards, and faced the very real prospect of sun-stroke and dehydration sailing up to 12 hours a day. Posted on 23 Jan 2017
The Ngalawa Cup set for January
Have you got what it takes to go back to basics? Whether you sail a one man Laser or a 90 foot catamaran, the chances are you'll be benefiting from modern technology, from glass reinforced plastic hulls to the latest carbon fibre sails. Posted on 13 Nov 2016