Please select your home edition
Edition
Rooster GETSEASMART 728x90
Product Feature
Lennon Racewear Thermalite 2015 Long John
Lennon Racewear Thermalite 2015 Long John
Boat Insurance from Noble Marine


Full racing risks
New for old cover
www.noblemarine.co.uk

An interview with Gabriele Pedone about the 2019 Miami Sailing Week

by David Schmidt 1 Mar 16:00 GMT March 4-10, 2019
Rigging to race at the 2018 Miami Sailing Week © Image courtesy of Miami Sailing Week

One of the coolest aspects of sailing is the opportunity to pick and choose one’s racing adventures and challenges. For example, while some One Design sailors seek only the toughest Olympic-level competition, others enjoy the opportunity to race dinghies and beach cats hard all day before heading ashore for the chance to socialize with their competitors and explore a new or different city. If the later sounds like your speed, Miami Sailing Week (March 4-10) could be your perfect late-winter sailing escape.

Miami Sailing Week began in 2010 and has-like a lot of regattas-experienced different iterations of itself en route to becoming a welcoming and friendly regatta for dinghy sailors of all ages.

One interesting aspect of the regatta’s history is its emphasis on involving adult and junior-level classes, giving sailors of all ages an opportunity to rub elbows and gunwales, both on the water and in the dinghy park. Not only does this encourage family-wide participation, but it also provides a great opportunity for younger sailors to watch how adults play the game on a significantly faster and higher level.

And, for anyone who is rapidly loosing patience with winter’s seemingly never-ending grasp, Miami Sailing Week also provides a reprieve and an opportunity to start polishing one’s starting-line skills ahead of the coming spring and summer regattas.

I checked in with Gabriele Pedone, event director for the 2019 Miami Sailing Week, via email, to learn more about this One Design regatta.

How many boats do you hope to see at this year’s event? Also, what classes will be best represented when the starting guns begin sounding?

We’re excited to see lots of boats registering for the event. We’re over 155 as we speak, and on our way to becoming the largest regatta during the month of March. We're also happy to see boats from several different countries and, of course, many locals.

The main classes we will see are the A-Cats, Optis and Lasers and some 420s.

Our headquarters will be Regatta Park, a magnificent area that will serve as our main event area.

It looks like 2018 featured A-Cats, but it also looks like the 2019 MSW has invited Lasers, I420s, C420s, 29ers, 505s, F16s and F18…what was the inspiration to invite other classes and other sailors to this year’s event? Also, are Opti’s in for the 2019 MSW?

2018 was a transition year for us, but as they say ‘it always seems impossible until it’s done’.

We are pleased that A-Cats and Opti’s are back, and we extended additional invitation to the Lasers, 420s, 29ers, 505, F16 and F18. Not all classes will be able to join in 2019, but we established relationships and we’re comforted by the positive feedback we received.

What kind of competition levels can visiting sailors expect to encounter at MSW?

I love the wind because you can’t buy it and because it makes competition always challenging and interesting at the same time. Our sailors will have the opportunity to race among sailors of different level and will have the opportunity to measure their skills.

We’re not an Olympic or Championship regatta, but that’s not our goal either; we want to promote sailing at every level.

Where will racing physically take place? Also, are we talking Windward-Leewards, or will theRace Committee also involve other shapes and reaching legs?

Racing will take place on Biscayne Bay, the lower end of the bay across from CGSC.

The Coconut Grove Sailing Club's talented race committee will set up courses according the prevailing conditions with upwind and downwind legs and other shapes to spread the field. We’re planning to operate three different courses, making the racing enjoyable for both the adults and the youth.

What kinds of evening and onshore entertainment can sailors expect? Miami, of course, has a great reputation when it comes to nightlife…

We’ll be offering different entertainment for adults and youth. The grown-ups will enjoy the best bar in town, the only place where the world famous “Dark & Stormy” will be served along with food and music.

For the kids, we’ll have a separate area where they can play games and enjoy a Tiramisu party!

I notice that there’s a real blend of youth and adult classes at the 2019 MSW—what kinds of culture are you trying to create at the regatta?

Miami Sailing Week was established in 2010 and is preparing for its 10th anniversary event, which is an important milestone for us and for Miami.

The event is not just a regatta; it’s more like a program that wants to celebrate sailing and sailing-related activities. “The Next Ten Years” is the slogan we created for this year’s event because we see this anniversary event as the starting point of a new journey!

Can you tell us about any steps that you and the other event organizers have taken in the last couple years to help green-up the regatta or otherwise reduce its environmental footprint?

We encourage sailors to be mindful of the environment and of Biscayne Bay fragile ecosystem. We encourage not using plastic and created recycling opportunities in the hospitality area. We would definitely like to do more, and it’s going to be a discussion point for the next ten years of our event.

Anything else that you’d like to add, for the record?

Miami Sailing Week’s goal for the next ten years is to further establish the event as a non-profit experiential program with wide-ranging activities that embrace the sport of sailing. We want to become a marquee event that’s far more than just a regatta. For example, we want to create opportunities for the Community to be closer to event, and for businesses to benefit from the event.

We’d also like to use the event to create opportunities for the City of Miami and Miami-Dade County with the national and international sailing communities, while also earning media exposure. Finally, we want to do more to create opportunities to for newer and younger sailors to get involved in sailing and sailboat racing.

Related Articles

World Sailing's chance to move sailing forwards
The big question is will they take it? A big decision is coming up this weekend for sailing. The decision makers are those right at the centre of the sport's governing body: World Sailing's Council. Will they support their own appointed evaluators, or even vote on the decision at all? Posted on 14 May
Guardians of the Galaxy
Collection. Agglomeration. Assemblage. Cumulation. Medley. Collection. Agglomeration. Assemblage. Cumulation. Medley. Yes, the moment I realised I had a small gathering of bits for this editorial I was immediately thinking of Drax the Destroyer from the movie whose title is our headline today. Posted on 12 May
Sticks and Stinks – They do mix!
SCIBS looms, predominantly a powerboat event, with a few sails too SCIBS looms, and whilst it is predominantly a powerboat event, there are a few sticks around. One that will undoubtedly standout against its far cruisier cousins, will be the one above the very racey hull form that is the FarEast 28R. Posted on 5 May
RS Aero wins Equipment trials
For the 2024 Olympic Men's and Women's One Person Dinghy The RS Aero has won World Sailing's Equipment trials (Sea Trials) for the 2024 Men's and Women's One Person Dinghy Event. The four boats tested were the D-Zero, Laser, Melges 14 and RS Aero. Posted on 3 May
Make 2019 count! Leaner, greener washbags
More space in your sailing kit bag, and less environmental impact When it comes to our own cleaning products, there are a lot of simple switches that can dramatically reduce our plastic use, waste and environmental impact. They also can free up space in your kitbag by dramatically reducing what you need. Posted on 29 Apr
Lower than Badminton
And yes, I am aware that a badminton net is reasonably high And yes, I am aware that a badminton net is reasonably high. I did used to like to play the game, for it was a bit like golf. Whack it, and it really did not matter to the object of your energy, could more than likely make it worse actually. Posted on 28 Apr
Life Raft and Life Jacket Servicing Importance
With Ocean Safety's Service Manager David Godfrey We spoke to David Godfrey, the Service Manager at Ocean Safety about the importance of life raft and life jacket servicing. These are items which every yacht owner has on board, but are often not maintained appropriately. Posted on 24 Apr
The need for innovation
70 boats out for a mid-week twilight jaunt, and just half a dozen for Saturday means something... You know when a club can get like 70 boats out for a mid-week twilight jaunt, and then just half a dozen for Saturday windward/leewards that something is going on. It is not that sailing isn't something people want to do. Posted on 14 Apr
It's all about having fun!
Enjoyment is the single biggest factor in motivating children to be active Enjoyment is the single biggest factor in motivating children to be active. Posted on 11 Apr
Feather duster
As in knock me down… Like this wasn't going to happen As in knock me down... Like this wasn't going to happen. No semaphore was required here. Intrigue in the AC is nothing new. It is a shame, for sure, but we commented at the time of the late arrivals that the cash pool simply was not big enough. Posted on 7 Apr