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Dinghy ID

Printed From: Yachts and Yachting Online
Category: General
Forum Name: Beginner questions
Forum Discription: Advice for those who are new to sailing
URL: http://www.yachtsandyachting.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=13706
Printed Date: 24 Oct 21 at 10:40am
Software Version: Web Wiz Forums 9.665y - http://www.webwizforums.com


Topic: Dinghy ID
Posted By: John clarkson
Subject: Dinghy ID
Date Posted: 29 Oct 20 at 8:34pm
Hi guys
Picked up a project but no one knows what it is
No sails so no logos ,no plate on it

It's around 16 feet long , I thought
Wayfarer but my commodore thinks not?

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John



Replies:
Posted By: Noah
Date Posted: 29 Oct 20 at 9:56pm
Not a Wayfarer, they’re double chined. No idea what that might be. Any sails with insignia? Any makers plate on the hull anywhere?

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Nick
https://www.fireballsailing.org.uk/index.asp?selection=boat-register&subsel=14821" rel="nofollow - GBR 14821 Sijambo



Posted By: 423zero
Date Posted: 29 Oct 20 at 10:02pm
Features a 'Mirror 16' angle of boat not helping.

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Robert


Posted By: Pastyman
Date Posted: 29 Oct 20 at 10:10pm
Looks like an early Kestrel


Posted By: John clarkson
Date Posted: 29 Oct 20 at 11:06pm
Hi
Thanks guys , no there is no markings
Of any sort .

Hopefully someone will know
For definite as more view .

Cheers
John

-------------
John


Posted By: jaydub
Date Posted: 29 Oct 20 at 11:13pm
Originally posted by Pastyman

Looks like an early Kestrel
I'll second that.


Posted By: JimC
Date Posted: 30 Oct 20 at 1:15am
I wondered about Kestrel, but then I thought I saw a wood centreboard. Also does the position of the jib track suggest a large genoa?

To the OP though, when you consider the condition of the decks, need to source sails, replace gear etc etc, I submit that is a project you should pass by. You could spend several hundred quid and end up with a boat worth nearly nothing. There are much better projects almost everywhere.




Posted By: MerlinMags
Date Posted: 30 Oct 20 at 7:25am
Jim is right - it must have a large genoa.

Can you measure the length and beam (width) exactly? That will help!


Posted By: John clarkson
Date Posted: 30 Oct 20 at 7:59am
Hi
I will do it's about ten miles away
So might take a while

As to repairs , it is very sound structurally
It's fibreglass so no rot
Just good clean and paint and boat is
Fine .

When I decided to try sailing there wasnt
Anything this size for under 600 700 only mirrors
Or enterprises to small for my family.

The club is giving me a new mast so just sails and rigging , which I know won't be cheap but it's the only if spend at least to start with .

Youm mention centre board it actually has a heavy duty metal one ?

Cheers
John











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John


Posted By: Pastyman
Date Posted: 30 Oct 20 at 9:08am
I think its a G-Mach built Kestrel, early  boats had a pretty big genoa , i can clearly remember them as a light wind menace handicap racing 


Posted By: 423zero
Date Posted: 30 Oct 20 at 9:16am
https://images.app.goo.gl/FvE3XsPnetrsSkQ86 (looks like a kestrel mk1)

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Robert


Posted By: Sam.Spoons
Date Posted: 30 Oct 20 at 10:19am
Kestral class rules with detailed measurements here  http://www.kestrel.org.uk/classrules.html" rel="nofollow - http://www.kestrel.org.uk/classrules.html

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Spice 346 "Flat Broke"
Blaze 671 "supersonic soap dish"


Posted By: JimC
Date Posted: 30 Oct 20 at 10:53am
If its a metal board then it is probably an ancient Kestrel, 40 or 50 years old at a guess. Its a mistake to think that glass fibre boats last for ever, they do deteriorate. In addition to the glass fibre parts going soft and losing their finish, leaving fibres to give you glass fibre itch an especial killer is bits of wood in obscure, inaccessible and yet vital places that have rotted out.

It's up to you, but if I were putting the sums together (and I am no stranger to basket cases and major boat refurbishments) I would reckon that free was at least a couple of hundred quid too much. I would be surprised if you could put that boat back in good club sailing condition for as little as £600. Sails, ropes, rigging, fittings, paint, launching trolley, cover, these things all add up. And when you've spent 600 odd quid it will be worth maybe 150.

But the worst thing is the sheer frustration of sailing a life expired boat. Every time you sail it another thing goes wrong, and it's a truncated sailing day and cart it back home to fix.


Posted By: 423zero
Date Posted: 30 Oct 20 at 11:40am
I would add, often GRP boats from the sixties had MDF blocks not wood inserts.

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Robert


Posted By: John clarkson
Date Posted: 30 Oct 20 at 6:38pm
Hi
Thanks for ID

Bundle of laughs on here isn't it.

I haven't got 10k for a new dinghy

So will give it a go .

I shall buy most bits pre owned
And if it's hopeless will just sell
Them.

If we get to Bob about in the estuary
All we want for now

Cheers
John















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John


Posted By: 423zero
Date Posted: 30 Oct 20 at 6:48pm
Hi John,
Just trying to help, both jimc and myself are members of CVRDA, which is a forum for people who sail and restore old and unusual boats. Plenty of Y&Y members are also very knowledgeable regarding repairing boats and how to get the best out of sailing any particular boat, please don't hesitate to ask for help or advice.
I would speculate that the majority of sailors don't buy £10,000 boats, has iGRF will tell you sailors are a tight fisted lot.


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Robert


Posted By: Rupert
Date Posted: 30 Oct 20 at 7:25pm
Hi John,

Have owned many old grp dinghies over the years. A few have been mistakes but most have been a cheap way of getting on the water. If 15 feet long suspect this is a Kestrel, as said. Good tough boats to play around in, though powerful so some care needed.

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Firefly 2324, Lightning 130, Puffin 229, Minisail 3446 Mirror 70686


Posted By: John clarkson
Date Posted: 31 Oct 20 at 7:51am
Thanks guys

I really want a wayfarer as
Like the idea of cruising.

Really want this to perfect
Sailing technique 100 meters from the club
Slipway . Last sailed 30 years ago
On an enterprise at Rutland water.
I wasn't any good then either.

The deal breaker I think for it
Is will it take a small outboard
Just to get us out of trouble
If needed. I know a lot of wayfarers
Have a little 2.5hp Honda on the back
Thanks again
John

-------------
John


Posted By: 423zero
Date Posted: 31 Oct 20 at 10:50am
If you can remember handling Enterprise on shore 30 years ago, Wayfarer probably 3 times heavier, first class cruising boat, but you need to think about handling ashore.

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Robert


Posted By: ColPrice2002
Date Posted: 31 Oct 20 at 6:17pm
Try the Wanderer! It's a 14 ft small brother of the Wayfarer.
It's much much easier to manhandle ashore than a Wayfarer...

COlin


Posted By: Sam.Spoons
Date Posted: 31 Oct 20 at 8:26pm
Nice boat and probably the ideal compromise but, I suspect, significantly over the OPs budget. 



-------------
Spice 346 "Flat Broke"
Blaze 671 "supersonic soap dish"


Posted By: Rupert
Date Posted: 31 Oct 20 at 10:04pm
A GRP Leader might work nicely, though.

-------------
Firefly 2324, Lightning 130, Puffin 229, Minisail 3446 Mirror 70686


Posted By: John clarkson
Date Posted: 03 Nov 20 at 12:05pm
Hi out of interest what would you
Expect to pay for a seaworthy wanderer
With sails and trailer ?

Cheers
John




-------------
John


Posted By: SoggyBadger
Date Posted: 03 Nov 20 at 4:10pm
Originally posted by John clarkson

Hi out of interest what would you
Expect to pay for a seaworthy wanderer
With sails and trailer ?

Cheers
John




There's an old one on Apollo Duck ATM for £2495. Wanderers to seem to command a high price though. If your budget can't stretch to that then maybe look for an old GRP GP14. You can sometimes find them for around £500.


-------------
Best wishes from deep in the woods

SB



Posted By: Sam.Spoons
Date Posted: 03 Nov 20 at 5:26pm
You say an Ent is too small so have a look out for Topper Sport 14 or 16, Laser 16 and, a bit more expensive, Laser Stratos. All are heavy but are very roomy, stable and good family boats.
.

Or there are three Wayfarers on Apollo Duck for £1k. 
.   

Stratos 250kg. 
.   

Wayfarer 169kg. 
.   

Sport 16 180kg. 
.   

Wanderer 129kg. 
.   

GP14 133kg. 



-------------
Spice 346 "Flat Broke"
Blaze 671 "supersonic soap dish"


Posted By: 423zero
Date Posted: 03 Nov 20 at 5:58pm
How much more room is in a Wayfarer, compared to a Enterprise? Trying to find the recent thread with the Ent for about £600,lot of boat for the money, substantially lighter too.

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Robert


Posted By: Sam.Spoons
Date Posted: 03 Nov 20 at 6:19pm
Enterprise is 404 x 162 cm and 96kg (hull only) Waybarge is 485 x 185 and 167kg, the Wayfarer is significantly roomier than an Ent but a lot heavier to launch and recover. 

I love Ents and they can carry two adults and two kids in reasonable comfort under sail, oars and motor but if weight off the water is not a problem and cruising with a family is the priority then a Wayfarer is the better choice.


-------------
Spice 346 "Flat Broke"
Blaze 671 "supersonic soap dish"


Posted By: JimC
Date Posted: 04 Nov 20 at 1:05am
A useful but nearly impossible to arrange exercise would be to compare the useful area in the cockpit of different classes to see how much usable room there is. I would *guess* that the W has something like 50% more than the E, but you pay for that with 50% more weight as is entirely reasonable.


Posted By: 423zero
Date Posted: 04 Nov 20 at 7:08am
I had 2 tillers for my Ent' a short one for cruising (half the length of the standard),allowed you to sit right aft, and the standard one.

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Robert


Posted By: ColPrice2002
Date Posted: 04 Nov 20 at 5:08pm
My wife learnt to sail in a Wayfarer, you can get 4 adults sitting on the windward side (6 rolls in the mainsail). If you're cruising, then a Wayfarer will take 3 adults comfortably plus youngsters.
The Enterprise is good for 2 adults, and limited room for others (Assuming stern sheeting - not centre main - that reduces the crew space).
Our Wanderer(stern sheeting) is comfortable for the 2 of us, with spare space.
The advantage of the Wanderer/Wayfarer for cruising is that you can easily have roller furling for the jib and slab reefing for the mainsail. That makes it much easier to adapt to wind changes on the water.
Older GPs are good (3 - 4 adults - with care).

Colin


Posted By: John clarkson
Date Posted: 06 Nov 20 at 5:04pm
Hi thanks guys
Because of your input thinking of scrapping the kestrel

If iam going to spend 600 and days of work
On it .

Sounds like I can get something ready to
Go for that money or a bit more

Our enterprise was a little small
For my family but will look at the variants .

Out of those suggested which is most stable

Great you tube of two guys up near loch Ness on a wanderer
J





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John


Posted By: 423zero
Date Posted: 06 Nov 20 at 5:12pm
GP14 and Wayfarer very stable.

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Robert


Posted By: Sam.Spoons
Date Posted: 06 Nov 20 at 6:21pm
If it's for cruising and the weight is not an issue onshore the Wayfarer is likely to offer best bang for buck, I don't think a GP is any roomier than an Ent though it's weight makes it a little more stable.

-------------
Spice 346 "Flat Broke"
Blaze 671 "supersonic soap dish"



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