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Weta, fastest boat on the water!

Printed From: Yachts and Yachting Online
Category: Multihulls
Forum Name: Dinghy multihulls
Forum Discription: For those who prefer two (or more) hulls to one!
URL: http://www.yachtsandyachting.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=11200
Printed Date: 20 Nov 19 at 7:26pm
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Topic: Weta, fastest boat on the water!
Posted By: stewart smith
Subject: Weta, fastest boat on the water!
Date Posted: 11 Nov 13 at 7:40pm
I keep seeing videos and reading posts about how fast the Weta trimaran is! They didn't like the handicap worked out by SCHRS but like to sail their PY of 950. That is 3% slower than a Sprint 15 and 10% slower  than the old Dart 16. Is that fast for a boat with 3 sails and made of carbon fiber? Perhaps their should have used plastic!

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Stewart Smith



Replies:
Posted By: yellowwelly
Date Posted: 12 Nov 13 at 9:36am
I think it's relative... most Weta sailors come from monohull, displacement sailing backgrounds.

A Weta that makes it around the course is faster than a capsized Musto Skiff, a Moth that trips up on every gybe and a hell of a lot faster than any Laser or Solo- even one sailed by the best dinghy sailors in the country.

The fact that it is not a Cat, and by and large, has been rejected by the monohull community is a marketing issue for them, not a speed one.    




Posted By: Rupert
Date Posted: 12 Nov 13 at 6:30pm
I saw one in the boat park at Weymouth - it looked quite small compared to the cats nearby, so I'm not surprised it is slower.

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Firefly 2324, Lightning 130, Puffin 229, Minisail 3446


Posted By: catmandoo
Date Posted: 13 Nov 13 at 12:32pm
its the fastest trimaran called a weta ;) 

am sure many monos would hump it off the water


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Posted By: Rupert
Date Posted: 13 Nov 13 at 2:37pm
Originally posted by catmandoo

its the fastest trimaran called a weta ;) 

am sure many monos would hump it off the water


Are you trying to say that many single hulled dinghies would find it attractive on the land and would like to make love to it?


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Firefly 2324, Lightning 130, Puffin 229, Minisail 3446


Posted By: Nipper
Date Posted: 14 Nov 13 at 12:16pm
Originally posted by yellowwelly

I think it's relative... most Weta sailors come from monohull, displacement sailing backgrounds.

A Weta that makes it around the course is faster than a capsized Musto Skiff, a Moth that trips up on every gybe and a hell of a lot faster than any Laser or Solo- even one sailed by the best dinghy sailors in the country.

The fact that it is not a Cat, and by and large, has been rejected by the monohull community is a marketing issue for them, not a speed one.    


Is it a marketing issue?
Its heavy (100kg by the look of the web site), its relatively complex to rig and sail (3 sails), its not as manoeuvrable as a dinghy on or off the water, it looks pretty tricky to right after a capsize, and its not particularly fast (PY 950 is similar to a Vortex). Given the carbon etc, its probably not that cheap either.
In the UK is a Laser/Musto Skiff/RS 700/RS600/Solo/RS100/D-1/Streaker sailor really going to get one?
 


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39 years of dinghy racing and still waiting to peak.


Posted By: yellowwelly
Date Posted: 14 Nov 13 at 12:25pm
no, they're not.  They live in the UK and most of us will plump for what we know, feel comfortable with and can actually find someone to race against.  As this isn't a monohull, nor a cat, there is no established market for it outside of PY, and PY boats sub 1000 have limited market due to restrictions- be that tidal or lake bank.... 

however in emerging markets, without the baggage of our complexity, they can sell it as fast and accessible... which it is I guess.  



Posted By: Jack Sparrow
Date Posted: 14 Nov 13 at 1:09pm
But what it does offer is a FAST boat that is stable, can be sailed and raced without worry of the wind strength or physical infirmity. That you can also cruise without safety cover or do distance touring that is also a great holiday boat for sailing with a young or even not so young family. Or even fished from.

It's actually rather a gem of a boat, but I doubt the small minded dinghy sailor in the UK will understand these virtues. As we don't have a culture of enjoying the natural world unless we are competing against someone for a tatty plastic cup, unlike the majority of the rest of the world.

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Posted By: catmandoo
Date Posted: 14 Nov 13 at 1:46pm
oooooooo misses take a swipe at your fellow sailors then , handbags at dawn is it ;) 

despite chasing crap plastic cups in my stealth and god forbid to admit snotter , i spend many more hours cruising the west coast of scotland in my AWB , so I guess I can understand the attrubutesyou attest to .

however reading behind the lines , its weta and weta sailorsmarketing itself as the fastest thing on three legs that folks are pulling its leg about . as if no other dinghy had ever gone sooo fast .

theres a place for everyone and thing on the water as mole said to ratty :)


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Posted By: yellowwelly
Date Posted: 14 Nov 13 at 1:46pm
Clap well written Jack


Posted By: Jack Sparrow
Date Posted: 14 Nov 13 at 2:12pm
Thanks Mr Welly

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Posted By: yellowwelly
Date Posted: 14 Nov 13 at 2:28pm
I know in a Malcolm X kind of way, sailing a Solo in a local fleet isn't really helping, but I can't help but admire a well written, witty and succinct appraisal of the UK dinghy scene.


Posted By: Rupert
Date Posted: 14 Nov 13 at 2:34pm
The great thing about chasing plastic cups is the company. And, sailing inland, there is only so much exploration you can do before finding everything on the lake there is to find.

However, racing dinghy sailors do tend to have a blinkered outlook in general when it comes to exploration. I had a wonderful time on Windermere in a Mirror earlier in the year, just playing, and on the Broads a couple of years before that. It is something I keep on meaning to do more of (and the Weta would make a good steed), but trotting along to Opens is easier in many ways, and is fun, too.


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Firefly 2324, Lightning 130, Puffin 229, Minisail 3446


Posted By: Nipper
Date Posted: 14 Nov 13 at 3:50pm
Originally posted by Jack Sparrow

But what it does offer is a FAST boat that is stable, can be sailed and raced without worry of the wind strength or physical infirmity. That you can also cruise without safety cover or do distance touring that is also a great holiday boat for sailing with a young or even not so young family. Or even fished from.

It's actually rather a gem of a boat, but I doubt the small minded dinghy sailor in the UK will understand these virtues. As we don't have a culture of enjoying the natural world unless we are competing against someone for a tatty plastic cup, unlike the majority of the rest of the world.
I'm more cynical than small mided. I have seen so many dinghies hit the market in the last 30+ years where the marketing budget far outweighs the design budget, or the concept or execution is fatally flawed, that another "new" fantastic concept and marketing b*ll leaves me cold.  
 
The market for the Weta does indeed look as if it is more suitable for the cruising/exploring, wizzing around type market, but we do not have that in the UK. We have small lakes, featureless reservoirs, the water is cold for 10 months a year, we have a generally inhospitable coastline, we have huge tidal ranges, and to top it off an unreliable damp climate.
 
Hence in the UK we have turned everything into a racing boat even when it was designed to be "multi-purpose", because a) The opportunities for interesting exploring/cruising are so limited, b)Being at one with nature in the UK generally means being cold and miserable on your own c) Brits like the camaraderie of being a member of a club and aprticularly sports clubs, d) The Brits are a very competitive race and love sport.
 
Somewhere hot/sunny/windy with a sandy beach, no issue, I'd leap into a Weta for a blast.
6 knots of breeze on a Sunday morning in November for a club race on some godforsaken pond in middle England, give me the Laser, where using all my senses in trying to get to the mark ahead of the 6 other competitors, takes my mind off what a miserable day it is.
 
That is what the Weta is up against in the UK, not small mindedness.
 


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39 years of dinghy racing and still waiting to peak.


Posted By: Jack Sparrow
Date Posted: 14 Nov 13 at 4:59pm
I don't think I could have written a better argument for what I was talking about than you have just written.

In my view the UK is a spectacular place to sail for pure pleasure. This boat allows you to take in our fantastic scenery with your family in safely. You are fast enough to punch tide and light enough to handle ashore! What's even better is if decided to test your metal against your fellow Brit, you can do it - amazingly, all in the same boat! But the most incredible thing of all is that you will not the slowest boat on the course, you will be one of the fastest. That seems quite a good deal to me to achieve from one boat.

I might add, I'm sorry you feel that concerned about sailing around our coastline. God knows what those Kiwi's must be thinking when they leave there shore!

It's time to read some real peoples endorsements I think - LINK %20" rel="nofollow - http://www.wetamarine.com/gallery/endorsements

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Posted By: yellowwelly
Date Posted: 14 Nov 13 at 5:08pm
I think it depends on your view of pleasure... there's no way I can convince my wife sailing here is pleasurable.  She's just too cold most of the time.  That's why our family sailing is always abroad- somewhere with 300 days a year + sunshine.  I keep a windsurfer onboard too- this doubles as a paddle board. It's 100% about fun.

The 'sacrifice', if you can call it that, is that we don't utilise the local club for any family activities and I'm unlikely to introduce my kids to dinghy racing.

Weta / Mirror / Halbery Rassy.... wouldn't matter, not here, not with this crappy climate.


Posted By: shadeux
Date Posted: 14 Nov 13 at 5:31pm
There are also disabled sailors for whom tris like the weta present an opportunity to get out on the water and carry on enjoying their sport in relative safety.

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Bruce
Shadow002


Posted By: Nipper
Date Posted: 14 Nov 13 at 11:07pm
Originally posted by yellowwelly


The 'sacrifice', if you can call it that, is that we don't utilise the local club for any family activities and I'm unlikely to introduce my kids to dinghy racing.


And that exactly sums up the problem that most UK clubs are facing today.

It seems ironic that today's sailing gear is so much better than it was 30 years ago, but less people are sailing, with the cold being the main reason why partners and children are not interested.


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39 years of dinghy racing and still waiting to peak.


Posted By: Nipper
Date Posted: 14 Nov 13 at 11:15pm
[QUOTE=Jack Sparrow]

I might add, I'm sorry you feel that concerned about sailing around our coastline. God knows what those Kiwi's must be thinking when they leave there shore!

/QUOTE]

Don't feel sorry for me. I was just pointing out that there are large parts of our coastline where no one in their right mind would want to be washed onto.

Having an inhospital shore makes you treat the wind and water with respect, which may be why the Kiwis are such good sailors, as they know if the broke the boat they were going to get washed onto the rocks.

If you are not concerened sailing around the UK coast, then you are either niave or irresponsible.


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39 years of dinghy racing and still waiting to peak.


Posted By: sargesail
Date Posted: 15 Nov 13 at 7:01am
Originally posted by Nipper

[QUOTE=Jack Sparrow]

I might add, I'm sorry you feel that concerned about sailing around our coastline. God knows what those Kiwi's must be thinking when they leave there shore!

/QUOTE]

Don't feel sorry for me. I was just pointing out that there are large parts of our coastline where no one in their right mind would want to be washed onto.

Having an inhospital shore makes you treat the wind and water with respect, which may be why the Kiwis are such good sailors, as they know if the broke the boat they were going to get washed onto the rocks.

If you are not concerened sailing around the UK coast, then you are either niave or irresponsible.

Or you're treating the wind and water with respect and making appropriate decisions based on that.  It's about how you approach it.  (My dinghy cruising credentials include Plymouth to Weymouth as a 17 year old (supported) and cross channel as a 16 year old (very supported).  I'd like to repeat that, or similar, with the family someday.


Posted By: yellowwelly
Date Posted: 15 Nov 13 at 9:11am
Originally posted by Nipper

Originally posted by yellowwelly


The 'sacrifice', if you can call it that, is that we don't utilise the local club for any family activities and I'm unlikely to introduce my kids to dinghy racing.


And that exactly sums up the problem that most UK clubs are facing today.

It seems ironic that today's sailing gear is so much better than it was 30 years ago, but less people are sailing, with the cold being the main reason why partners and children are not interested.

yes, the irony isn't lost on me.  I started with a Gul wetsuit bought from Brentwood Windsurfing, just inside the M25 on the A12... it was crap, it didn't work and it took ages to put on as it was a zipless design and you had to roll the thing on like a giant sock... even that was bit new school, shorts and t-shirt and a spray suit was more common, along with a guernsey and bobble hat in the winter.  iirc you were judged by what brand of beer your arse happened to be promoting.

I guess creature comforts have made our society a bit softer, but at the end of the day I'm not going to force something on them all that they find thoroughly miserable on all but the three days of decent sunshine (with wind) that we get in this country.  


Posted By: Nipper
Date Posted: 15 Nov 13 at 9:42am
[

Or you're treating the wind and water with respect and making appropriate decisions based on that.  It's about how you approach it.  (My dinghy cruising credentials include Plymouth to Weymouth as a 17 year old (supported) and cross channel as a 16 year old (very supported).  I'd like to repeat that, or similar, with the family someday.
[/QUOTE]
I agree with you 100%, and good luck in repeating your adventures with your family.
 
My response was against JackSparrow's assertion that UK dinghy sailors were small minded and hence didn't embrace dinghy cruising, and by inference, could not see the virtues of the Weta.
 
The Weta might be a good cruising boat, BUT you cannot escape the fact that distance cruising in the UK because of all the weather/coastline/temperature issues means that it is only ever going to be a niche activity, and therfore the boat market to feed that activity is going to be relatively small.
 
Its not smallmindedness, its reality
 
 


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39 years of dinghy racing and still waiting to peak.


Posted By: Nipper
Date Posted: 15 Nov 13 at 10:28am
Originally posted by yellowwelly

Originally posted by Nipper

Originally posted by yellowwelly


The 'sacrifice', if you can call it that, is that we don't utilise the local club for any family activities and I'm unlikely to introduce my kids to dinghy racing.


And that exactly sums up the problem that most UK clubs are facing today.

It seems ironic that today's sailing gear is so much better than it was 30 years ago, but less people are sailing, with the cold being the main reason why partners and children are not interested.

yes, the irony isn't lost on me.  I started with a Gul wetsuit bought from Brentwood Windsurfing, just inside the M25 on the A12... it was crap, it didn't work and it took ages to put on as it was a zipless design and you had to roll the thing on like a giant sock... even that was bit new school, shorts and t-shirt and a spray suit was more common, along with a guernsey and bobble hat in the winter.  iirc you were judged by what brand of beer your arse happened to be promoting.

I guess creature comforts have made our society a bit softer, but at the end of the day I'm not going to force something on them all that they find thoroughly miserable on all but the three days of decent sunshine (with wind) that we get in this country.  
GUL didn't even exist when I started. Dad and I got our wetsuits from a shop opposite Eastleigh Railway station, whose name escapes me. As wetsuits were really expensive, he bought me a ready made 2 piece suit in 5mm, that fitted where it touched (room to grow) and then he bought himself a wet suit kit, which he then made on the kitchen table. The suit was unlined, and it used to take about 20mins to put on in a cloud of talc. powder
 
The following season was then spent with us both walking like Robots as your arms and legs just sprung back when you bent them, and Dad continually regluing the suit back together . ( An arm once fell off when he was getting changed)
 
Like you, we were in the minority in wearing wetsuits, and we sailed on the sea from April to November wearing bobble hats knitted by my Aunty, and I cannot remember feeling cold. One piece overalls with beer mats were still 2 years away.
 
Ahh the good old days.
 
 


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39 years of dinghy racing and still waiting to peak.


Posted By: Jack Sparrow
Date Posted: 15 Nov 13 at 11:21am
I started in wellington boots with wool socks, a wooly jumper and my granddads Kapok WW1 naval life preserver ( which didn't fit ). Wet suits you pussies!

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Posted By: yellowwelly
Date Posted: 15 Nov 13 at 11:35am
wetsuits that don't work.... mmmmm, the bitter/sweet feeling of warming yourself in your own piss, just to get even colder, and itchy and smelly.  And today's kids complain about the humiliation of wearing a cock logo on their thigh....

And whichever clown it was that said to get into one in a hot shower was a complete moron. I have never been colder in my life than walking out of a changing room in a damp wetsuit, only to have the biting cold freeze the suit to my skin, then to go 'tacking on the whistle' in winter training after a chilly launch....  really, it's child cruelty and I'm beginning to sound like Fuller.




Posted By: Peaky
Date Posted: 15 Nov 13 at 11:45am
Cruising around the Bay of Islands or Able Tasman national park in NZ is a different league to any sailing I've done here, so i can fully see why people in NZ would want a Weta to explore those areas. I'd love to spend a few days sailing around Windemere or the Broads, but can't convince the family it would be fun


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Posted By: iGRF
Date Posted: 15 Nov 13 at 12:26pm
You've got to do the Broads, even if you take a motor cruiser, our kids have always enjoyed it.

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Posted By: iGRF
Date Posted: 15 Nov 13 at 12:31pm
Originally posted by yellowwelly

wetsuits that don't work.... mmmmm, the bitter/sweet feeling of warming yourself in your own piss, just to get even colder, and itchy and smelly.  And today's kids complain about the humiliation of wearing a cock logo on their thigh....
And whichever clown it was that said to get into one in a hot shower was a complete moron. I have never been colder in my life than walking out of a changing room in a damp wetsuit, only to have the biting cold freeze the suit to my skin, then to go 'tacking on the whistle' in winter training after a chilly launch....  really, it's child cruelty and I'm beginning to sound like Fuller.


Glad to see I'm getting through to you, you'll be realising the handicap system is an equipment system next, as to 'tacking on the whistle' I used to watch that up at Grafham, as pointless an exercise as ever there was.
And standing in the shower in a wetsuit only works if it's a total smooth skin and you dry the outside of the suit before going out. Anyone who has a cock on his thigh is... well I leave you to fill that one in, no point in further aggravating she who must be irritated constantly..

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Posted By: Jack Sparrow
Date Posted: 15 Nov 13 at 12:56pm


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Posted By: Peaky
Date Posted: 15 Nov 13 at 1:26pm
I'm a big fan of Tenby, Jack. I don't know the western isles, but I don't kbnow how easy it would be to get a Weta there? Where's the middle picture?
But the bay of islands is warm as well as gorgeous - paradise!

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Posted By: Nipper
Date Posted: 15 Nov 13 at 1:43pm
Originally posted by Peaky

Cruising around the Bay of Islands or Able Tasman national park in NZ is a different league to any sailing I've done here, so i can fully see why people in NZ would want a Weta to explore those areas. I'd love to spend a few days sailing around Windemere or the Broads, but can't convince the family it would be fun
I'm not jealous of NZ at all when we beaches like ours to visit and launch from....
 
Cant think why the wife is not keen....



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39 years of dinghy racing and still waiting to peak.


Posted By: Nipper
Date Posted: 15 Nov 13 at 1:48pm
Originally posted by Nipper

Originally posted by Peaky

Cruising around the Bay of Islands or Able Tasman national park in NZ is a different league to any sailing I've done here, so i can fully see why people in NZ would want a Weta to explore those areas. I'd love to spend a few days sailing around Windemere or the Broads, but can't convince the family it would be fun
I'm not jealous of NZ at all when we have beaches like ours to visit and launch from....
 
Cant think why the wife is not keen....



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39 years of dinghy racing and still waiting to peak.


Posted By: yellowwelly
Date Posted: 15 Nov 13 at 2:17pm
we have a high concentration of people in the UK over a relatively small land mass.  This can give us a false perception that we are diverse, and open minded in all sorts of things- sailing being one of them.

Comparing our beaches and sailing waters here needs to be put into the wider European context if we are going to measure ourselves to the Antipodes or the US travel brochure.  

Across Europe we have some simply fantastic sailing on offer- from Ice Yachting in Denmark, to some of the best wave spots on the world for board riding.  The med offers amazing yacht cruising, coupled with culture- Valencia, Nice and Barcelona being big cities on the coast with amazing sailing, and the legacy of Ancient civilisations needs no introduction in Greece, Sardinia, Corsica, Southern Italy etc.  All of which are popular holiday destinations for water user.   

You couldn't ask for more idyllic conditions than Croatia or the Italian lakes for all manner of sailboats for family fun.  Even here in Blighty we have active traditional fleets of fishing smacks and local one designs racing all across the UK.  West Highland Week is supposed to be the best kept secret in amateur big boat racing... far better than Cork, Cowes or Ramsgate allegedly.    And one of my favourite spots to sail has been Poole Harbour... I can't think I won't go back there.

It's very easy to think it's crap here when the focus of attention for dinghy racing is two big puddles in the Midlands, another one under the Heathrow flight path and a couple of shingle beaches along the M27.   When that's seemingly the alternative to club racing, it's easy to see why the lure of the circuit has a diminishing power when you're paying for it yourself; as opposed to going along for the ride of a childhood hobby.    Even the potency of class racing has limited appeal- especially if you are fortunate to get it locally.  I remember hearing someone moan that the 'Parkstone boys don't travel'.  Why the hell would they?  Would you pack your sh*t up to leave Poole Harbour to go race a few more people on some god awful water company reservoir?

In reality, the European dinghy racing scene is very alive with something for everyone and ample opportunities to all come together once in a while if you choose the right sort of boat- the International Classes are a good place to start.  Obviously that isn't cheap... but who said sailing was cheap?




Posted By: Jack Sparrow
Date Posted: 15 Nov 13 at 3:36pm
Originally posted by Peaky

I'm a big fan of Tenby, Jack. I don't know the western isles, but I don't kbnow how easy it would be to get a Weta there? Where's the middle picture?
But the bay of islands is warm as well as gorgeous - paradise!


The middle pic is The Helford - Cornwall

The UK's warm enough for me.

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Posted By: Pewit
Date Posted: 26 Jan 14 at 1:32am
Originally posted by Nipper

Its heavy (100kg by the look of the web site), its relatively complex to rig and sail (3 sails), its not as manoeuvrable as a dinghy on or off the water, it looks pretty tricky to right after a capsize, and its not particularly fast (PY 950 is similar to a Vortex). Given the carbon etc, its probably not that cheap either.
In the UK is a Laser/Musto Skiff/RS 700/RS600/Solo/RS100/D-1/Streaker sailor really going to get one?
 


1. Weight - see spec http://www.wetamarine.com/theboat/specifications" rel="nofollow - here
It's not heavy for a boat with 3 hulls!
A Laser is 60 Kg (the same weight as the Weta main hull) a Hobie 16 is 145Kg a Hobie 14 is 109Kg
I launch and retrieve my Weta single handed from a pontoon which has a 30cm (1ft) drop to the water.

2. Rigging
It can be rigged in less than 30 mins
[TUBE]FqfPzOJlcZg[/TUBE]

3. Manoeuvrability
It's much more manoeuvrable off the water than most multihulls - since with float arms stowed over the top it's only  1.7M wide - about the same as a Laser. (The pontoon I launch from is reached from a gantry only 2M wide  - try launching any of the boats you mention from there!)


As it has a daggerboard to rotate around, it's much faster to tack than a cat and certainly no slower than a mono-hull in any wind over 5 knots.

4. Capsizing
It's very hard to capsize (because of the added buoyancy of the floats) and, unlike most multihulls, it doesn't require a massive float on top of the mast to prevent it capsizing nor does it need outside assistance to right it.  All you do is undo a port on the end of one of the floats to sink it and it comes up like a monohull.
[TUBE]_xXm-x3OgD0[/TUBE]

5. Speed
With 3 sails, It's faster and more stable than most monohulls of similar size. All of those boats you mention are fine in light winds - but ask the owners to go out in 25 knots or take the kids with them for a sail and you'd get a different reaction.
Also, unlike a monohull, it's not hard work to sail upwind in a breeze - mainly because you can sit on the floats and the harness included* helps to hold you up. Much easier for ex Laser sailors (like me) who's knees are starting to give out.
* The reason for the harness is that the boat is so stable it could sail on without you if you fell out!
You can also sail and race it two-up in high winds - try 42 miles in 25-37 knot winds in ANY of the boats you mention or have sailed in without capsizing or breaking something.
[TUBE]4AIisNuG7CI[/TUBE]

6. Price
The UK price at launch was £6,950 (may have changed since) which is very competitive for what you get.
The price includes alloy launch trolley, 3 hi‐tech Gaastra sails, carbon mast, float arms and bowsprit, boat cover, carbon foils and rigging bag.
The hulls, spars and foils are made in China to keep the price down.
Sails are from Gaastra in the USA
Hardware from Ronstan


Posted By: JimC
Date Posted: 26 Jan 14 at 11:47am
The trouble with your post is it illustrates the problem. Its not (heavy/unmanouverable/expensive/whatever) for what it is, but what it is isn't what most folk are looking for. For most people its a bit of a solution looking for a problem, and it doesn't matter how well implemented it is if it doesn't fulfil a perceived need in prospective owners.


Posted By: Pewit
Date Posted: 26 Jan 14 at 9:55pm
Can you explain how my post illustrates the problem?

What I was looking for was a boat with a high performance, that I can rig and launch myself, that doesn't cost the earth, that doesn't take up too much space, that doesn't have a huge learning curve to sail, that I can go racing with or go for a blast.  Are my requirements so different from yours or anyone else?

There are 1000 Wetas sold around the world and I don't think the UK is that unique that a small Trimaran doesn't fit the needs of some users - it's the same people who buy single-handed skiffs or "seniors" single handers because their knees are gone from Laser sailing  - or buy a Wayfarer or Hobie to take the family out on. You can use a Weta for either market - that's its USP.

Marketing is the thing that drives the need, however, and it does need better marketing in the UK - it also needs more dealers to fill the demand.

I think you should sail one and then make up your mind.


Posted By: JimC
Date Posted: 27 Jan 14 at 9:20am
Originally posted by Pewit


1. Weight It's not heavy for a boat with 3 hulls
3. Manoeuvrability It's much more manoeuvrable off the water than most multihulls
As it has a daggerboard to rotate around, it's much faster to tack than a cat and certainly no slower than a mono-hull in any wind over 5 knots.
4. Capsizing All you do is undo a port on the end of one of the floats to sink it.


Posted By: RS400atC
Date Posted: 27 Jan 14 at 9:25am
But it's not high performance is it?
A dart 15 is faster, simpler and actually has boats to race against.

I can see the Weta being fun, but as soon as people start to take it seriously, it will be raced hiking hard off the float upwind and the fun will go out of it. It seems to be unclear whether it's intended to be hiked or sailed like a challenger?

I'd like to see one at speed in choppy water, looks to me that the leeward float would dig in?
Tri's are great, but I want one of those Dragonfly 28's.....


Posted By: Pewit
Date Posted: 27 Jan 14 at 3:22pm
"The Sprint 15 (formerly Dart 15) was designed in 1979 " ('nuff said!)
I's heavy for a 2-hull boat - 104 kg
Probably because it's got a heavy aluminium mast (very fashionable in the 1970s!)

The Weta is already raced "hard off the float upwind"  - there are already https://www.nextsailor.com/app/page/regatta/17/entries" rel="nofollow - 17 Wetas entered for Wetafest in Florida in March already (20 entries in 2013). And a similar number did the French nationals last year.

But unlike (say) a Laser it's still a lot of fun just to take it out for a sail - as I did today. 7-10 knots of breeze. Landed on a beach - had a swim - then raced home with the kite up as the sea-breeze had picked up.  As usual on Sydney Harbour, it was very choppy because of the amount of traffic, especially the ferries, and at no time did the leeward hull "bury itself" Did you view the video of the Weta in the http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4AIisNuG7CI" rel="nofollow - Double Dammed Race ? - Choppy enough for you? You should also read the http://www.sail-world.com/USA/Sail-World-Boat-Test:-Flying-the-fabulous-Weta/69469" rel="nofollow - 2010 Boat of the Year review which was sailed in choppy seas, apparently.

As a rule, when beating and reaching,  if the water line on the leeward hull reaches the centre line of the float it's the signal to get your arse over the side or ease the main. As you will have read in the reviews, if the leeward hull does get buried fully, the boat just stops and off you go again (unless you're very stupid and don't ease the sails or bear away).

Sailing downwind, the central hull provides additional buoyancy and so even if you do plough into the back of a wave or two (as I did crossing behind a ferry in 25 knots 2 weeks ago), it pops up with no drama and carries on.

I think there are two schools of thought on the hiking from the tramp Vs sitting on the float method. The young and fit prefer to hike  - the slightly more mature prefer to sit on the float as it's much more comfortable with the harness holding you up - provided you've put foam padding under the edge of the tramp.

Can we compare apples with apples please.
The http://www.sailchallengers.com/" rel="nofollow - Challenger Trimaran was designed in the 1970s for disabled sailors using a seat mounted in the central hull. https://www.google.com.au/search?q=challenger+trimaran&safe=off&hl=en&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=g1zmUua4GcKekQXUh4DQDA&ved=0CCoQsAQ&biw=1536&bih=707" rel="nofollow - All the pictures I can find on Google and on their website show it being sailed in this manner and not from the floats - unlike the Weta. The Challenger is heavier (140Kg) and wider (3.5M) than the Weta probably due to the age of the design (aluminium spars, foils and fibreglass hulls) and target market.  http://www.weta.org.uk/page9.html" rel="nofollow - Sailaibilty UK have a couple of Wetas in their fleet in Spain using a drop in seat for the helm (aka Weta GT).

http://www.trimarans.com/boats/dragonfly-28/specifications.aspx" rel="nofollow - Dragonfly 28 looks very nice and solves storage/berthing issues like the Weta.

Want to try a Weta in the UK?  - contact the http://www.weta.org.uk/" rel="nofollow - Class Association


Posted By: yellowwelly
Date Posted: 27 Jan 14 at 3:30pm
Originally posted by Pewit

 

But unlike (say) a Laser 

blah

Can we compare apples with apples please.


sure


-------------


Posted By: Rupert
Date Posted: 27 Jan 14 at 3:36pm
Laser is fun to take out for a blast too, it has to be said. Most boats are. If comparing blasting boats, then number of hulls makes little difference - a bit like whether you pick an apple, pear or satsuma from the fruit bowl when peckish - they might be different, but they basically fulfill the same role. In the case of fruit, to taste nice and be better for you than chocolate, in the case of a boat, to have fun. Now, some may not like Satsumas or catamarans very much, but it is simply a matter of taste, not fact.

-------------
Firefly 2324, Lightning 130, Puffin 229, Minisail 3446


Posted By: laser193713
Date Posted: 27 Jan 14 at 4:58pm
http://www.weta.org.uk/page8.html

This is possibly one of the strangest Class Association pages I have read in a long time. As far as I can tell it outlines all the reasons not to buy a Weta. 

It's a shame its all been made as a picture file not text because it would be quite funny to post some quotes on here!


Posted By: RS400atC
Date Posted: 27 Jan 14 at 5:20pm
Originally posted by Pewit

"The Sprint 15 (formerly Dart 15) was designed in 1979 " ('nuff said!)
I's heavy for a 2-hull boat - 104 kg
Probably because it's got a heavy aluminium mast (very fashionable in the 1970s!)
........" Did you view the video of the Weta in the http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4AIisNuG7CI" rel="nofollow - Double Dammed Race ? - Choppy enough for you? You should also read the http://www.sail-world.com/USA/Sail-World-Boat-Test:-Flying-the-fabulous-Weta/69469" rel="nofollow - 2010 Boat of the Year review which was sailed in choppy seas, apparently.

....


The Sprint 15 is the comparison I chose, because it's a fun singlehanded multihull, which I know a couple of people who sail them for some of the reasons which the Weta claims to be good for.
The Sprint is significantly faster on PY. Maybe not a great comparison, but unless the Weta is PY bandit, the Sprint would appear to kick its bottom.
It's also about the slowest cat than can muster much of a fleet I think?

Yes I had a look at that video. We frequently race through much harder conditions than that, going downwind is the easy bit. The problem comes when beating against a wind-against-tide condition. In the RS400, it's very very wet. In a cat, one hull does all the work and sailing fast and a bit free seems to work well. I would expect the leeward float of a Weta to dig in and try to force the boat to bear off. Then again, these are not 'fun' conditions, the fun starts after the windward mark.
I suspect the Weta's alleged ability in 30knot winds would not apply in our tides.


Posted By: Pewit
Date Posted: 28 Jan 14 at 10:49pm
All I can say is that he sails in Scotland so his experience may be different than yours - it's certainly different to mine!

However, any boat takes longer to set up the first time you do it - there's a link to a video above which shows the boat being rigged in 25 mins.

He is right about needing to wear warm clothing - it is a very wet boat and  because of the speed you also get significant wind chill - like most multihulls.

Originally posted by laser193713

http://www.weta.org.uk/page8.html

This is possibly one of the strangest Class Association pages I have read in a long time. As far as I can tell it outlines all the reasons not to buy a Weta. 

It's a shame its all been made as a picture file not text because it would be quite funny to post some quotes on here!


Posted By: Pewit
Date Posted: 28 Jan 14 at 11:27pm
Originally posted by RS400atC


The Sprint 15 is the comparison I chose, because it's a fun singlehanded multihull, which I know a couple of people who sail them for some of the reasons which the Weta claims to be good for.
The Sprint is significantly faster on PY. Maybe not a great comparison, but unless the Weta is PY bandit, the Sprint would appear to kick its bottom.
It's also about the slowest cat than can muster much of a fleet I think?


I think people get hooked up on speed when it's really how often you can use it that counts. It has been given a PN of 950 which is not far out - if a Weta and an RS400 finish level, the Weta will win on handicap.

After three years of club racing in the UK (although probably not with the greatest sailors) and with input from sailors in Dubai and the USA, a consensus has emerged that a Portsmouth Number (PN) of between 930 and 980 is fair when racing in confined water in moderate conditions against monohull dinghies of similar performance.  Relative to monohull dinghies of moderate performance the Weta does better as the wind strength increases. In very light conditions it goes at about the same speed as an RS100 (PN 996) around a triangular course whereas in F4 and above it goes about the same speed as an RS400* (PN 947).  It is relatively faster upwind than downwind and does relatively poorly on windward/leeward courses.  On the other hand, on passage races or river courses with close reaches it often does well. It is thus hard to handicap accurately,

There has been little experience of racing against small multihulls but it ought to be comparable with the Hobie 14 and perhaps the Sprint 15.  The only remotely comparable boat with a published PN is the Vortex which has a trapeze and a much larger asymmetric spinnaker*. It has a PN of 945.

More http://www.weta.org.uk/page14.html" rel="nofollow - here

* A larger 16sqM kite is available for the Weta for handicap racing in light winds.
http://www.weta.org.uk/page14.html" rel="nofollow -
Originally posted by RS400atC

Yes I had a look at that video. We frequently race through much harder conditions than that, going downwind is the easy bit. The problem comes when beating against a wind-against-tide condition. In the RS400, it's very very wet. In a cat, one hull does all the work and sailing fast and a bit free seems to work well. I would expect the leeward float of a Weta to dig in and try to force the boat to bear off. Then again, these are not 'fun' conditions, the fun starts after the windward mark.
I suspect the Weta's alleged ability in 30knot winds would not apply in our tides.


Sailing upwind in 30 knots requires you to feather up as much as you can and then ease the main in the gusts as soon as the leeward hull starts to bury. Generally with the windward hull flying it's much dryer than a monohull in those conditions. The leeward hull is narrow and has little to resist the water flow so it doesn't force you to bear off - it just submarines until the gust passes (or you ease) and then pops up again.

The Double Dammed video shows wind against the 3 knot river flow so it is comparable to wind against tide. As I mentioned, the extra buoyancy of the central hull means that it tends not to dig in as much as a cat would in comparable conditions and it's much more stable than a monohull.

Have a look at the the video from some of the other boats in the fleet below and Dave Bernstein's race report http://www.wetamarine.com/about/news/170-double-dammed-42-miles-37-knots" rel="nofollow - here . Still not convinced?
 [TUBE]aBrs-Nqt-dc[/TUBE]

The guys in San Francisco race in strong winds and big seas all the time. And the water's freezing too.
[TUBE]nA8XZdNEkZw[/TUBE]

Here's a video of Dave Bernstein from SF sailing upwind in 18-20 knots in tidal chop. Notice the tiller angle - it's straight ahead 90% of the time.
[TUBE]A46CPWFXXeY[/TUBE]



Posted By: Pewit
Date Posted: 28 Jan 14 at 11:32pm
Originally posted by Rupert

Laser is fun to take out for a blast too, it has to be said. Most boats are. If comparing blasting boats, then number of hulls makes little difference - a bit like whether you pick an apple, pear or satsuma from the fruit bowl when peckish - they might be different, but they basically fulfill the same role. In the case of fruit, to taste nice and be better for you than chocolate, in the case of a boat, to have fun. Now, some may not like Satsumas or catamarans very much, but it is simply a matter of taste, not fact.


Well up to a point  - but a Laser is pretty slow and hard work going upwind - unless you have legs of steel.


Posted By: RS400atC
Date Posted: 28 Jan 14 at 11:34pm
Originally posted by Pewit

All I can say is that he sails in Scotland so his experience may be different than yours - it's certainly different to mine!

However, any boat takes longer to set up the first time you do it - there's a link to a video above which shows the boat being rigged in 25 mins.

He is right about needing to wear protective clothing - it is a very wet boat and because of the speed you also get significant wind chill.


Having mucked about in other boats, one of the things that takes me back to the 400 is the fact that you stay a lot drier than most boats. It makes a huge difference early and late in the year. Multihulls really do give you more wind chill, as will a faster trap boat like an 800. A drysuit helps, but there is no remedy for the constant wet cold spray in the face that some boats deliver in Solent chop.

On the wrong side of 50, cold is an isue.


Posted By: Pewit
Date Posted: 28 Jan 14 at 11:58pm
Originally posted by RS400atC


Having mucked about in other boats, one of the things that takes me back to the 400 is the fact that you stay a lot drier than most boats. It makes a huge difference early and late in the year. Multihulls really do give you more wind chill, as will a faster trap boat like an 800. A drysuit helps, but there is no remedy for the constant wet cold spray in the face that some boats deliver in Solent chop.

On the wrong side of 50, cold is an isue.


We used to break the ice to launch in the winter series when I sailed from Bough Beech in a Laser - you soon learnt not to capsize!

Many of the Weta sailors are MAMINs (Middle Aged Men In Neoprene) so we all share the cold issue. I wear a short arm 3mm wetsuit with a long sleeve rash vest, spray top (if cold) and neoprene reef shoes.

The San Fran guys seem to have sorted the clothing out for cold conditions the best - most seem to wear Wetsuits as Dave explains http://www.wetamarine.com/about/news/172-sailing-gear-review" rel="nofollow - here



Posted By: yellowwelly
Date Posted: 29 Jan 14 at 12:06am
That last video looks like a quick but ultimately very boring ride.... Given the bay to play in, I'd rather take the laser. A Finn, Contender or 505 wouldn't be rejected either.

-------------


Posted By: Rupert
Date Posted: 29 Jan 14 at 8:48am
Originally posted by yellowwelly

That last video looks like a quick but ultimately very boring ride.... Given the bay to play in, I'd rather take the laser. A Finn, Contender or 505 wouldn't be rejected either.


Boat mounted cameras never make it look that exciting, I guess coz the camera is moving with the boat. Pretty sure the helm was having fun. But then, he must like pears, whereas you like apples. Pewit is definitely not an apples man...

The analogy might be wearing thin. Been trying to work out what fruit keelboat sailors are. Grapefruit, perhaps?


-------------
Firefly 2324, Lightning 130, Puffin 229, Minisail 3446


Posted By: JimC
Date Posted: 29 Jan 14 at 9:29am
Originally posted by Rupert

Been trying to work out what fruit keelboat sailors are. Grapefruit, perhaps?

When it comes to those who do the corpse hung over a wire bit that they call hiking, I fear that only fruitcake will do...


Posted By: Presuming Ed
Date Posted: 29 Jan 14 at 11:02am
The good thing about keelboat sailing is that with the division of labour on larger boats, non-sailors can get onboard and start contributing very quickly. Takes no time to pick up the basics of grinding, for example. Much quicker returns for a beginner than dinghies. 


Posted By: Wetabix
Date Posted: 29 Jan 14 at 11:03am
Well, I've read some rubbish on this forum over the years but this thread takes the biscuit! The temperature here in the North of Scotland is about six degrees and the water must be about the same. But the sun is out and there has been no significant rain for weeks. Yesterday I went down to the dinghy park to check that the boat hadn't blown away but it was so nice I decided to go for a sail. Swaddled in four layers of jerseys plus a drysuit, ski gloves and goggles it took me  three minutes to manoeuvre my 'unwieldy' boat to the water's edge and a further four to hoist the sails. A passer-by was kind enough to take my trolley.  Once on the water I braved our 'ferocious' tide and made my way out into the open sea where I sailed along our 'inhospitable' coastline for a while talking to the seals and the dolphins. The killer whales and basking sharks that we had in the summer seem to have left. The nearet ship was an oil rig about ten mile away and the nearet land to the NNE was Spitzbergen. The mountains were capped with snow. It was quite lumpy and so I came back through the surf into our tidal bay which is similar in some ways to the Norfolk Broads.  There was not much wind but I was able to short tack up the river section against the current. When the board touched the stony bottom it made the most dreadful noise but in three years I have done no damage that couldn't be repaired in ten minutes.  Turning round and running back to the bay I got a puff and the SpeedPuck showed 11 knots even without the screecher  and I got hosed with cold water. The boat is certainly designed for hot climates and is undoubtedly better on a big lake than a small Midlands gravel pit and it is probably a better recreational boat than a mixed fleet racer because of the impossibility of handicapping it over the wind range. It is not 'the fastest boat on the water' but it is one of the fastest boats without a trapeze and at the age of 71 I ain't going to start trapezing any time soon (although I am fitting a trapeze handle to the shrouds so that I can get my 17 stone onto the float and back in again which will give the same righting moment).

Back at the beach the 'ferocious' tide had come up a bit and it was only a short drag up the slipway which I managed unaided. The boat weighs more than a Phantom but the trolley weighs a LOT less and the total weight on the wheels must be similar. It takes a bit longer to de-rig because you have to roll up the sail - say seven minutes plus another three to tie the boat down securely.

I have only capsized once in three years, the boat does not pivot round the leeward float when heeled because the drag is exactly balanced by the luffing tendency due to heel (very clever). I'm sorry you don't like my website but it gives real information, not manufacturers' bland sales talk. 

See the boat at the dinghy show!


Posted By: yellowwelly
Date Posted: 29 Jan 14 at 4:45pm
beta product...?

http://www.weta.org.uk/weta%20warnings.html" rel="nofollow - http://www.weta.org.uk/weta%20warnings.html


-------------


Posted By: Rupert
Date Posted: 29 Jan 14 at 6:10pm
Originally posted by yellowwelly

beta product...?

http://www.weta.org.uk/weta%20warnings.html" rel="nofollow - http://www.weta.org.uk/weta%20warnings.html


Looked like a very useful, honest page to help owners. Fewer problems than most classes, I'd guess.


-------------
Firefly 2324, Lightning 130, Puffin 229, Minisail 3446


Posted By: JimC
Date Posted: 29 Jan 14 at 6:16pm
T terminals falling out while sailing?? Hard to blame that on the boat!


Posted By: RS400atC
Date Posted: 29 Jan 14 at 6:31pm
Originally posted by Wetabix

.....
I have only capsized once in three years, the boat does not pivot round the leeward float when heeled because the drag is exactly balanced by the luffing tendency due to heel (very clever). I'm sorry you don't like my website but it gives real information, not manufacturers' bland sales talk. 

See the boat at the dinghy show!


Does that really work?
Surely as soon as the chop is enough to cover the front half of the leeward float, the drag around the beam goes up rapidly? The main hull might be level in the water at the time.
I think some much bigger tri's have found this in choppy water in the RTIR.
I do understand the advantages of sailing in 'proper waves' that come from a long way away, much more pleasant to sail in the long waves off cornwall than the short chop we often get here.

I don't see any problem with your website.


Posted By: Jack Sparrow
Date Posted: 29 Jan 14 at 6:58pm
Originally posted by Wetabix

Well, I've read some rubbish on this forum over the years but this thread takes the biscuit! The temperature here in the North of Scotland is about six degrees and the water must be about the same. But the sun is out and there has been no significant rain for weeks. Yesterday I went down to the dinghy park to check that the boat hadn't blown away but it was so nice I decided to go for a sail. Swaddled in four layers of jerseys plus a drysuit, ski gloves and goggles it took me  three minutes to manoeuvre my 'unwieldy' boat to the water's edge and a further four to hoist the sails. A passer-by was kind enough to take my trolley.  Once on the water I braved our 'ferocious' tide and made my way out into the open sea where I sailed along our 'inhospitable' coastline for a while talking to the seals and the dolphins. The killer whales and basking sharks that we had in the summer seem to have left. The nearet ship was an oil rig about ten mile away and the nearet land to the NNE was Spitzbergen. The mountains were capped with snow. It was quite lumpy and so I came back through the surf into our tidal bay which is similar in some ways to the Norfolk Broads.  There was not much wind but I was able to short tack up the river section against the current. When the board touched the stony bottom it made the most dreadful noise but in three years I have done no damage that couldn't be repaired in ten minutes.  Turning round and running back to the bay I got a puff and the SpeedPuck showed 11 knots even without the screecher  and I got hosed with cold water. The boat is certainly designed for hot climates and is undoubtedly better on a big lake than a small Midlands gravel pit and it is probably a better recreational boat than a mixed fleet racer because of the impossibility of handicapping it over the wind range. It is not 'the fastest boat on the water' but it is one of the fastest boats without a trapeze and at the age of 71 I ain't going to start trapezing any time soon (although I am fitting a trapeze handle to the shrouds so that I can get my 17 stone onto the float and back in again which will give the same righting moment).
Back at the beach the 'ferocious' tide had come up a bit and it was only a short drag up the slipway which I managed unaided. The boat weighs more than a Phantom but the trolley weighs a LOT less and the total weight on the wheels must be similar. It takes a bit longer to de-rig because you have to roll up the sail - say seven minutes plus another three to tie the boat down securely.
I have only capsized once in three years, the boat does not pivot round the leeward float when heeled because the drag is exactly balanced by the luffing tendency due to heel (very clever). I'm sorry you don't like my website but it gives real information, not manufacturers' bland sales talk. 
See the boat at the dinghy show!


Sounds like a fantastic days sail (Jealous), and one I doubt (actually theres no doubt) I'd do in any other dinghy I can think of, if I ever had the opportunity too.

-------------
http://www.uk3-7class.org/index.html" rel="nofollow - Farr 3.7 Class Website
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1092602470772759/" rel="nofollow - Farr 3.7 Building - Facebook Group


Posted By: Pewit
Date Posted: 29 Jan 14 at 8:26pm
Originally posted by JimC

T terminals falling out while sailing?? Hard to blame that on the boat!


Blame it on the owner for not RTFM!

They can't fall out if properly installed and the rig has been tensioned. I think the only way for them to fall out while sailing is if you have very, very  loose shrouds or they haven't been inserted properly.

The only time mine have ever fallen out is if the shroud gets caught on something when picking the mast up off the boat before hoisting the mast.


Posted By: yellowwelly
Date Posted: 29 Jan 14 at 8:34pm
Originally posted by Pewit

Originally posted by JimC

T terminals falling out while sailing?? Hard to blame that on the boat!


Blame it on the owner for not RTFM!

They can't fall out if properly installed and the rig has been tensioned. I think the only way for them to fall out while sailing is if you have very, very  loose shrouds or they haven't been inserted properly.

The only time mine have ever fallen out is if the shroud gets caught on something when picking the mast up off the boat before hoisting the mast.

that's what I thought initially ... that's why I was surprised to see it listed as potential problem with the boat.  I assumed you guys were therefore running really slack rigging for this to be a proper design issue.

Just a case of RTFM... LOL


-------------


Posted By: Pewit
Date Posted: 29 Jan 14 at 8:47pm
Yes it does work - the vertical beams above the floats are only 70mm wide so don't produce much drag.
Find an owner through George and go for a sail in one!

We have short chop in Sydney Harbour all the time - stirred up by boat traffic and wind - especially a typical NE sea breeze as we had yesterday. You can only enjoy long waves if you sail out of the heads.
See the  http://www.seabreeze.com.au/graphs/nsw.asp" rel="nofollow - Seabreeze Wind/Wave Forecast and compare the wind direction and wave height/period - although it should be noted that this is for onshore waves not harbour waves. We do occasionally get big waves in the harbour too ;-)
[TUBE]wl7r79ujebQ[/TUBE]

Oh and I've only capsized twice - once when I went out in 30knots when I first got the boat and made the classic error of cleating the main in a blow. The second time was when I got hit by a southerly gust  while I was trying to get mooring lines and fenders out when sailing instead of stopping.

Originally posted by RS400atC

Originally posted by Wetabix

.....
I have only capsized once in three years, the boat does not pivot round the leeward float when heeled because the drag is exactly balanced by the luffing tendency due to heel (very clever).

See the boat at the dinghy show!


Does that really work?
Surely as soon as the chop is enough to cover the front half of the leeward float, the drag around the beam goes up rapidly? The main hull might be level in the water at the time.
I think some much bigger tri's have found this in choppy water in the RTIR.
I do understand the advantages of sailing in 'proper waves' that come from a long way away, much more pleasant to sail in the long waves off cornwall than the short chop we often get here.

I don't see any problem with your website.


Posted By: iGRF
Date Posted: 29 Jan 14 at 9:00pm
Biggest problem for marketing this boat? It's stupid name.

A shame because it ticks all the boxes I strived for in my creation, fast easy to sail.

But it's always a tough call if you can't even say the name properly, I mean is it Wheata? Wetta? Wita?

Then it's also confusing to the casual glance in it's demand for space.

All easy questions to answer, but then the next question, what market demographic is it being aimed at, and you have another hurdle.

So, a tough proposition.

-------------
https://www.corekite.co.uk/snow-accessories-11-c.asp" rel="nofollow - Snow Equipment Deals      https://www.corekite.co.uk" rel="nofollow - New Core Kite website


Posted By: Rupert
Date Posted: 29 Jan 14 at 9:14pm
I just thought it was pronounced wetter. No problem with the name for me. Better than just another number - 49er, 29er, 800, whatever.

-------------
Firefly 2324, Lightning 130, Puffin 229, Minisail 3446


Posted By: Wetabix
Date Posted: 29 Jan 14 at 9:55pm
You are correct in your pronunciation but you must do it with a New Zealand accent, so that the first syllable becomes 'Wit'   ('wit' being the opposite of 'droy'  in New Zealand)


Posted By: Pewit
Date Posted: 29 Jan 14 at 10:08pm
It's designed in NZ and named after a giant NZ cricket (because of the shape) which are among the largest and heaviest in the world able to fly. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weta" rel="nofollow - Wikipedia

Weta in Maori rhymes with better - hence the slogan "Better with a Weta"

Many boats have stupid names: Topper (aka t**ser), Lark, Wineglass, Gull (aka Dull - we had one) and a name is much easier to remember than a number - you may not like it but you don't forget it. RS and Laser have finally woken up to this and now use names for new models.

I would say there are two main demographics for the boat:

1. The casual sailor who wants a family boat that's easy to rig, doesn't take up too much space when stored, can be taken out with the kids as well as going out for a blast or de-powered (removing kite/jib) and stable for kids to learn to sail with.

2. The over 40s racer who's raced dinghies or keelboats but now finds them (a) boring (b) hard work and (c) expensive and may also have space, mobility or time issues. Often uses demographic #1 to justify boat investment to family!

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/sport/news/article.cfm?c_id=4&objectid=11158236" rel="nofollow - Weta events in NZ , France and the USA have often tried to appeal to both demographics by organising them near a resort or spa, by including short races, distance races requiring crew and an orienteering race requiring a crew member aged under 16.

[TUBE]Uxx65-DVbOY[/TUBE]
Originally posted by iGRF

Biggest problem for marketing this boat? It's stupid name.

A shame because it ticks all the boxes I strived for in my creation, fast easy to sail.

But it's always a tough call if you can't even say the name properly, I mean is it Wheata? Wetta? Wita?

Then it's also confusing to the casual glance in it's demand for space.

All easy questions to answer, but then the next question, what market demographic is it being aimed at, and you have another hurdle.

So, a tough proposition.


Posted By: iGRF
Date Posted: 29 Jan 14 at 10:22pm
Betta with a Weta? Shut up, perlease.

It's 2014, not 1954 over here, I guessed the demographic, but go after them a bit more scientifically and with a bit more of a sophisticated approach, explain stuff like your self furling screecher, point out the wetted area reduction, the power in the rig you can apply with the leverage, just because folk are new, don't treat them like morons.

And change the stupid name.

And get all that honest is best crap off that class website, nobody wants to know there are going to be problems, hell why not put a sign up saying don't buy this..

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Posted By: yellowwelly
Date Posted: 29 Jan 14 at 10:32pm
they could get the girl who wrote the Kona theme tune to give them a little ditty.... and yes, the name sucks, unless you plan to get a sponsorship gig with Tena Lady.

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Posted By: Pewit
Date Posted: 30 Jan 14 at 12:20am
You try telling a Maori to change the name!

Here's a quote from a new owner, a very experienced sailor, whom I think summarises the appeal of the boat exactly:

"Let’s recognize what the Weta is – and is not.  It is a great, very simple, non-technical, and fun boat to sail in a wide range of conditions, with a wide range of crew weights (and configurations).  Unlike many high performance boats, it has NOT been optimized for performance.  Rather, it is a terrific balance (IMHO) between performance, “feel”, simplicity, ease of rigging/handling, and reliability.

o   There are lots of other classes that are optimized for performance (e.g., A-Cats, Musto Skiffs). 

§  Foiling, exotic materials, more complicated rigging and/or controls, etc. are all part of their game.

o   Personally, I’m attracted to a high-performance, easy to rig boat that I can sail well into my 70’s (and hopefully beyond).

§  I love the fact that my wife (and former 470 crew from 30+ years ago) absolutely chortled with glee the first time she sailed the Weta, wanting to know why I hadn’t bought one years ago. 

§  The Laser, Musto Skiff, and windsurfers that I keep rigged at my house/dock are going to get a lot less use from me, my wife, my (adult) son (ex-505 crew), and other family members.



Posted By: iGRF
Date Posted: 30 Jan 14 at 12:26am
Yep whatever, it still changes nothing, it's a weird boat with a silly name to the casual observer and you have a marketing nightmare to overcome that.

I also wish you the best of luck in so doing, and I don't mean that sarcastic or ironically, anything that delivers the 'sizzle' quick and efficiently in a world of sausage lovers is a good thing,

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Posted By: laser193713
Date Posted: 30 Jan 14 at 9:58am
Originally posted by Pewit

You try telling a Maori to change the name!



You wont need to, is there a single Maori involved with the project!? 

Better in a weta is the most unimaginative slogan you could have come up with. It may rhyme in maori but that's not why it was chose, it rhymes in English too which is more likely the reason for the choice.

The fact the latest post quotes someone who has a laser, musto skiff, windsurfers etc suggests someone who has too many toys, and thats the problem, it's just another toy that only this sort of person will enjoy.

The marketing and class association is just shocking. Check out that awful map of the UK with the owners dotted sparsely around the country. I feel sorry for the poor bloke up in Scotland with hundreds of miles to his only friend (I mean Weta friend as well as the rest of the world)! 


Posted By: Pewit
Date Posted: 30 Jan 14 at 2:43pm
Originally posted by laser193713

Originally posted by Pewit

You try telling a Maori to change the name!
You wont need to, is there a single Maori involved with the project!? 
I won't because apparently you're going to do it - anyway Miranda Powie is the Weta Marketing Manager and so you can tell her all about how she's doing it wrong.
Originally posted by laser193713

The fact the latest post quotes someone who has a laser, musto skiff, windsurfers etc suggests someone who has too many toys, and thats the problem, it's just another toy that only this sort of person will enjoy.

So on one hand you ask who's buying the boat and the other you're criticising them because they choose to sail a Weta rather than the other boats they own.
Originally posted by laser193713


The marketing and class association is just shocking. Check out that awful map of the UK with the owners dotted sparsely around the country. I feel sorry for the poor bloke up in Scotland with hundreds of miles to his only friend (I mean Weta friend as well as the rest of the world)! 

Have you ever done any research?
Have you actually looked at the manufacturers website? (hint it's http://www.wetamarine.com" rel="nofollow - www.wetamarine.com )
Have you looked at the other regional websites?
Do you have any marketing qualifications?
Have you any work experience in international marketing?

If you can answer yes to any of the above, why don't you buy a Weta, come up with your own name (e.g. the "Dumba") and start your own UK class association.

http://tvnz.co.nz/business-news/amp-growing-weta-marine-video-4467331" rel="nofollow - Here's a recent TV interview with Chris Kitchen, director of Weta Marine, in which he talks about the development, manufacturing and marketing of the boat. I think he's got Maori heritage but then I'm not the one who thinks its an issue, so you ask him.


Posted By: laser193713
Date Posted: 30 Jan 14 at 3:06pm
Originally posted by Pewit

Originally posted by laser193713

Originally posted by Pewit

You try telling a Maori to change the name!
You wont need to, is there a single Maori involved with the project!? 
I won't because apparently you're going to do it - anyway Miranda Powie is the Weta Marketing Manager and so you can tell her all about how she's doing it wrong.
Originally posted by laser193713

The fact the latest post quotes someone who has a laser, musto skiff, windsurfers etc suggests someone who has too many toys, and thats the problem, it's just another toy that only this sort of person will enjoy.

So on one hand you ask who's buying the boat and the other you're criticising them because they choose to sail a Weta rather than the other boats they own.
Originally posted by laser193713


The marketing and class association is just shocking. Check out that awful map of the UK with the owners dotted sparsely around the country. I feel sorry for the poor bloke up in Scotland with hundreds of miles to his only friend (I mean Weta friend as well as the rest of the world)! 

Have you ever done any research?
Have you actually looked at the manufacturers website? (hint it's http://www.wetamarine.com" rel="nofollow - www.wetamarine.com )
Have you looked at the other regional websites?
Do you have any marketing qualifications?
Have you any work experience in international marketing?

If you can answer yes to any of the above, why don't you buy a Weta, come up with your own name (e.g. the "Dumba") and start your own UK class association.

http://tvnz.co.nz/business-news/amp-growing-weta-marine-video-4467331" rel="nofollow - Here's a recent TV interview with Chris Kitchen, director of Weta Marine, in which he talks about the development, manufacturing and marketing of the boat. I think he's got Maori heritage but then I'm not the one who thinks its an issue, so you ask him.

http://www.weta.org.uk/index.html have a look at this page, here is where I found the lonely scottish bloke!

I don't have a problem with the name at all actually... just blaming the Maoris for it is slightly odd...

I'm not suggesting that your owners should be sailing their other boats, I'm just suggesting that the type of person who buys them is someone who doesn't really know what they're looking for, hence why your case study has 3 boats and a bunch of windsurfers.

Yes I have looked at all the websites, so I guess that counts as research, a large part of my work is marketing on an international level. 

The answer to your final remark/question is very simple. There isn't a market in the UK to make a successful business from this product. If there was, I wouldn't go and rename the boat and start my own class as that would be highly illegal and would breach all the IPR of the builders. Good idea eh!? ConfusedOuch 


Posted By: Do Different
Date Posted: 30 Jan 14 at 3:44pm
Seems a shame this thread has turned rather confrontational.

The Weta appears to be a craft that efficiently fills it's design brief and appeals to it's target demographic.

Now it is not my cup of tea by any means but that doesn't draw me into disrespecting any of the people involved. 

Perhaps it would not sit that well in a lot of the racing activities at clubs frequented by most of the members of this forum, however I am thinking that there are several coastal areas around the UK where it could. The Essex estuaries come to mind, perhaps western Scotland sheltered sea lochs, Moray Firth and Firth of Forth.

Perhaps the name of this post draws in the chest puffing brigade. "Fastest Boat on the Water" is akin to waving a red rag in a bull ring.

I really think speed to some degree is often talked about but actually least important. The big thing that sells boats is the feel they give and that being rather a personal thing means you'll never please everybody.

   




Posted By: Rupert
Date Posted: 30 Jan 14 at 4:12pm
There do seems to be a few trolls at feeding time. Trouble is, the more defensive pewit gets, the more trolling is going to happen. And the thread title really did get it off on the wrong footing - as do different says, a boat like this isn't going to sell because of absolute speed.

Nice boat, will please some, not others, but fatuous comments about how someone who owns a Laser, Musto and windsurfers as well is someone who doesn't know what they are looking for really shouldn't be answered - I'm sure even grumf would balk at such a poor wind up.


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Firefly 2324, Lightning 130, Puffin 229, Minisail 3446


Posted By: iGRF
Date Posted: 30 Jan 14 at 4:12pm
Originally posted by Do Different

Seems a shame this thread has turned rather confrontational.]


One of the prime rules of and I forget the expression, but meaning self induced negative publicity in the expectation either you or others will counter and thereby lengthen an otherwise boring thread. As long as 'they' hold their temper and don't lose it like the italians in the D1 thread, a solid and even slightly heated discussion is good publicity, given we all have brains, and will make our own decision.

So now we need the mental marketing woman to come and explain herself.

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Posted By: Wetabix
Date Posted: 30 Jan 14 at 4:48pm
In passing, and slightly off topic except  to the extent that we mentioned names that might not necessarily chime in another country, did you know that the Americans have a class called the Woodpussy?


Posted By: RS400atC
Date Posted: 30 Jan 14 at 4:51pm
Originally posted by Do Different

Seems a shame this thread has turned rather confrontational.

The Weta appears to be a craft that efficiently fills it's design brief and appeals to it's target demographic.

Now it is not my cup of tea by any means but that doesn't draw me into disrespecting any of the people involved. 

Perhaps it would not sit that well in a lot of the racing activities at clubs frequented by most of the members of this forum, however I am thinking that there are several coastal areas around the UK where it could. The Essex estuaries come to mind, perhaps western Scotland sheltered sea lochs, Moray Firth and Firth of Forth.

Perhaps the name of this post draws in the chest puffing brigade. "Fastest Boat on the Water" is akin to waving a red rag in a bull ring.

I really think speed to some degree is often talked about but actually least important. The big thing that sells boats is the feel they give and that being rather a personal thing means you'll never please everybody.

  


There is a lot of fun to be had exploring in any boat, whether it's sailing over to the IoW in a Laser, around Hayling in whatever you have, up the fowey river in a Mirror, you name it.
It's good to look beyond racing, but I'm lucky enough to get to sail on bigger boats for my exploring these days.
I don't see how the Weta is greatly superior to other boats for this purpose?

I think it's an interesting concept, and it's nice to see something challenging the establishment, but making unsupported claims about its speed and ability in very strong winds does it no favours.

It leaves me confused about what the target market and demographic actually is.


Posted By: yellowwelly
Date Posted: 30 Jan 14 at 8:10pm
I just remember a story of how one got utterly nailed by Musto skiffs in Stokes Bay- probably complete fabrication mind.

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Posted By: Neptune
Date Posted: 30 Jan 14 at 8:18pm
Originally posted by yellowwelly

I just remember a story of how one got utterly nailed by Musto skiffs in Stokes Bay- probably complete fabrication mind.


Not that surprising if you look at the handicaps of each

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RS300, ex Musto Skiff


Posted By: Rupert
Date Posted: 30 Jan 14 at 9:24pm
I got overtaken by a Musto Skiff in my Lightning, too, but I knew which boat I'd rather be sailing, and I expect the Weta sailors would be happy with their choice. If I'd been in the skiff, the Lightning would have been overtaking me, while I sat on the upturned hull.

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Firefly 2324, Lightning 130, Puffin 229, Minisail 3446


Posted By: Neptune
Date Posted: 31 Jan 14 at 9:18am
You shouldn't be so defeatist Rupert, yes its a steep learning curve, best done when the water is warm, but incredible satisfying once your there. It actually make you learn to do many things again properly as bad habits are harder to cover up.

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RS300, ex Musto Skiff


Posted By: yellowwelly
Date Posted: 31 Jan 14 at 9:24am
Originally posted by Neptune

You shouldn't be so defeatist Rupert, yes its a steep learning curve, best done when the water is warm, but incredible satisfying once your there. It actually make you learn to do many things again properly as bad habits are harder to cover up.

yep- given a bit of time even a muppet can get one going:
 




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Posted By: Rupert
Date Posted: 31 Jan 14 at 11:17am
Why defeatist? Well, apart from the upturned hull comment, of course...

After owning boats with sliding seats, wings or narrow waterlines and massively flared topsides, where every movement alters balance, I came to the conclusion that I like boats that are basically stable. Years ago I saw the boats like the Musto as something I should be aspiring to, and that I was somehow a lesser sailor that I didn't enjoy  sailing them, even once I had the basics mastered. However, I can now see that it was simply sales talk, and that sailing an "easy" boat really, really well is just as good an aspiration.

Now, all I need is quality time in the boat of my choice - bit like all of us here.


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Firefly 2324, Lightning 130, Puffin 229, Minisail 3446


Posted By: Pewit
Date Posted: 31 Jan 14 at 1:31pm
Originally posted by Do Different

Seems a shame this thread has turned rather confrontational.


At last a sensible and constructive post.

I started sailing at Rock in Cornwall (where I still own a house) and hope to be able to borrow a nearby Weta to sail there in July as that wide estuary would be great - not to mention the waves on the doom bar for LOLs.

Narrow rivers would present a problem but anywhere where there's is a bit of space and they already have a multihull fleet would be fine. Bewl Valley, Queen Mary, Datchett, Rutland and Grafham come to mind for enclosed waters.

I did most of my early racing at Chipstead SC on a tiny lake near Sevenoaks and a Weta is definitely not suited to small sailing areas like that where you have little space to manoeuvre. I've also sailed out of Brighton, Littlehampton and Whitstable and I wouldn't like to take a Weta out of any location where you have to launch/retrieve on stones. However, there are plenty of places that do have sandy beaches or have wide ramps (e.g. Hamble, Solent etc) where it would be easy to launch.

That said, I launch my Weta single handed from a floating pontoon 30cm (1ft) above the water which is reached by a narrow gantry only 2m wide (the Weta on the trolley is 1.98m wide!). It annoys the hell out of the fisherman who use it until I remind them the only reason the dock is there is because it was built for the sailing in the 2000 Olympics.

I can't think of many other boats for adults with a similar performance you could launch from the same location, except perhaps a Laser. It many not be the easiest place to retrieve from but it is only 5 mins from home on the bike.

Originally posted by Do Different

The Weta appears to be a craft that efficiently fills it's design brief and appeals to it's target demographic.

Yes and nearly 1000 people around the world would agree with you  - which is interesting considering the boat was launched in 2006 in a market which has been shrinking or flat during that time (Boating activity is down 1% in the UK since 2005 - according to the research below). 

According to Chris Kitchen, Weta production is currently around 200/year with capacity for up to 500/year. I would be interested to know how many of the allegedly competing boats mentioned in this thread (especially those designed in the 1970s) are being made in similar volumes today. The only one I can think of is the Laser/Torch, but given their current licensing problems I suspect sales are down too.

I have over 30 years experience working in international marketing and product management roles for multi-national companies based in the US, Europe and now Australia and so I think I have some perception of how and why the Weta has been a success. The only comparable success I can think of in recent years in the UK was the introduction of the Laser SB3. It grew to be the largest class at Cowes Week in 4 years with 100+ boats - although it failed to crack either the US or Australian market (Poor marketing combined with the "Not Invented Here" syndrome, I suspect).

According to the http://www.britishmarine.co.uk/" rel="nofollow - British Marine Federation Watersports Participation Report 2012, 5.8% of the UK population participated in some form of on-water activity in 2012. Small Sailboat Activity was .8% of that total and Small Sailboat racing was .3%. 66% of all on water activities took place at the coast in 2012.

Of the 12 core boating activities, small sailboat racing and canoeing are most likely to take place inland. So the main target market for the Weta is the same coastal leisure sailor found in other markets, but the UK is possibly unique that people will sail in tiny inland venues (and I should know!) more than they are prepared to do elsewhere.

Here is my product positioning statement for the Weta for that sector (this is not official):

For families who want a watersport activity the entire family can enjoy, and who think sailing is expensive and elitist*, the Weta provides a flexible boat everyone can use. Unlike other dinghies or catamarans, the Weta is fun, easy and safe.

* Research by Yachting Australia shows that sailing is perceived as the most expensive, elite and dangerous sport of any on-water activity.
Originally posted by Do Different


Perhaps the name of this post draws in the chest puffing brigade. "Fastest Boat on the Water" is akin to waving a red rag in a bull ring.

I didn't start or name the thread but I do agree about the amount of bull!Wink
Originally posted by Do Different


I really think speed to some degree is often talked about but actually least important. The big thing that sells boats is the feel they give and that being rather a personal thing means you'll never please everybody.

Yes and no - one of the things that attracted me (and others from the mature racer category I would suggest) is that a Weta gives you the chance to experience skiff-type speed but without the learning curve and swimming that entails, or having to go on a crash diet.

Another Weta owner in Sydney had an RS100 and despite being a very experienced sailor, sold it to buy a Weta because the Weta was almost as quick but so much easier to sail in a wider range of conditions and therefore he uses it more.

I think some of the critics need to try one out because I have yet to read a negative review from someone who has actually sailed one. Talk to the guys at the Dinghy Show where the Weta will be on display.


Posted By: Pewit
Date Posted: 31 Jan 14 at 2:03pm
I think a Weta would easily meet your brief which was similar to mine - it is very stable but gives you much of the experience of a skiff but without having such a steep learning curve.

Originally posted by Rupert

Why defeatist? Well, apart from the upturned hull comment, of course...

After owning boats with sliding seats, wings or narrow waterlines and massively flared topsides, where every movement alters balance, I came to the conclusion that I like boats that are basically stable. Years ago I saw the boats like the Musto as something I should be aspiring to, and that I was somehow a lesser sailor that I didn't enjoy  sailing them, even once I had the basics mastered. However, I can now see that it was simply sales talk, and that sailing an "easy" boat really, really well is just as good an aspiration.

Now, all I need is quality time in the boat of my choice - bit like all of us here.


Posted By: Rupert
Date Posted: 31 Jan 14 at 2:08pm
If I sailed somewhere open, you could well be right.

Oh, except that part of my sailing brief is that boats need to cost a couple of hundred quid...


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Firefly 2324, Lightning 130, Puffin 229, Minisail 3446


Posted By: iGRF
Date Posted: 31 Jan 14 at 6:11pm
All that marketing experience doesn't change a knaff name and whilst I'm on the subject your own choice of moniker is a bit suspect.

'Pewit,' how are we supposed to pronounce that?

Pew then it?

Or p'wit

Should it have been Pee wit?

Certainly in good company, weird boat pimped by a weird ID.

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https://www.corekite.co.uk/snow-accessories-11-c.asp" rel="nofollow - Snow Equipment Deals      https://www.corekite.co.uk" rel="nofollow - New Core Kite website


Posted By: Pewit
Date Posted: 31 Jan 14 at 11:32pm
Congratulations! you win this threads "I have nothing to contribute so I'll just criticise the poster" award.

Oh, and you can't spell either  - http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Naff" rel="nofollow - naff doesn't have a K .  Call yourself a journalist -- Hahahah.

Originally posted by iGRF

All that marketing experience doesn't change a knaff name and whilst I'm on the subject your own choice of moniker is a bit suspect.

'Pewit,' how are we supposed to pronounce that?

Pew then it?

Or p'wit

Should it have been Pee wit?

Certainly in good company, weird boat pimped by a weird ID.


Posted By: iGRF
Date Posted: 01 Feb 14 at 12:39am
You didn't answer the question pew..

Oh and knaff is spelt with a k where I come from..

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Posted By: yellowwelly
Date Posted: 01 Feb 14 at 9:00am
the irony of a spelling debate about the word 'knaff' or 'naff' on a thread about the Weta... well it isn't lost on me. LOL

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Posted By: Rupert
Date Posted: 01 Feb 14 at 10:04am
Surely GRF isn't a journo - I thought he sold lady's underwear?

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Firefly 2324, Lightning 130, Puffin 229, Minisail 3446


Posted By: yellowwelly
Date Posted: 01 Feb 14 at 10:15am
no isn't that that iiiiTiick's daughter (colloquially known as 'the girl')... 

Grumpf formerly accessorised said lingerie with handbags and fanny packs.... he now winds folk up on STW and sells them some pretty cool bikes.  (we're less naive to actually buy V-Twins and Asbos...)

The iGRF designed fanny pack...





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Posted By: iGRF
Date Posted: 01 Feb 14 at 11:03am
The irony in this place if I started a thread about man bags, it would be taken enthusiastically and very seriously, there would then follow, that ultimate creation, the Rooster Satchell, complete with a fifteen page rule book on the correct mincing technique. This of course, nobody would get or understand, so a mincing dvd would be produced followed by a club tour by the Mincing Whisperer, it would sell out.
A Class of Mincers would be born, all sporting a chicken logo on their sail.
What's that you say? There already is one? Nooo..

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Posted By: iGRF
Date Posted: 01 Feb 14 at 11:18am
Ha! 'too late' came the cry.



Man satchel from the barking rooster co, how ironic is that.

Form an orderly queue now, but beware, there is unlikely to be an instruction book on mincing technique, maybe an opportunity for Clive..

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Posted By: yellowwelly
Date Posted: 01 Feb 14 at 11:40am
Originally posted by iGRF

maybe an opportunity for Clive..

[TUBE]zK7DeYjB0m8[/TUBE]


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Posted By: Pewit
Date Posted: 22 Mar 14 at 10:49pm
WetaFest USA

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mvJyTD_-vzE" rel="nofollow - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mvJyTD_-vzE

[TUBE]mvJyTD_-vzE[/TUBE]


Posted By: Alexv
Date Posted: 25 Mar 14 at 9:40am
It may the the fastest boat that is pretty subjective , depends on who is on the boat..


Posted By: Pewit
Date Posted: 06 Apr 14 at 5:15am
I'd agree but it is probably the fastest boat for the buck that the average sailor can go out on solo or 2/3 up and have a blast without a steep learning curve (compared to a moth or skiff) and without swimming all the time (yes you can capsize them but it's hard to do so).

That said, the winner of the US Weta-Fest (nationals) last year was Olympic Silver Medalist, Randy Smyth, sailing 2-up. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Randy_Smyth" rel="nofollow - Randy knows a thing or two about multihulls and also won the Everglades Challenge this year in record time using his self-designed and built trimaran, Scizzor.

[TUBE]MlTBPG8MzKk[/TUBE]
Originally posted by Alexv

It may the the fastest boat that is pretty subjective , depends on who is on the boat..





Posted By: catmandoo
Date Posted: 06 Apr 14 at 11:06pm
Dont look the fastest of fastest boats in that video , fastest stopping perhaps , sorry but with the thread title you gotta expect digs :) 

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