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Winter clothing whats best

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Tynesider View Drop Down
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    Posted: 13 Nov 17 at 8:41pm
I want to sail my dinghy all winter (on a lake) and currently have a 3/4 mm wetsuit which is fine but winter is coming,

But what to do?

Add and buy a good thermal vest, or buy a good spray top, or buy a thicker winter wet suit 5/6mm or maybe face up to it that I should buy a dry suit which I am not that mad on as they always look restricted.

I appreciate any advice as to the pros & Cons

Mike

Edited by Tynesider - 13 Nov 17 at 8:42pm
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Post Options Post Options   Quote ColPrice2002 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Nov 17 at 9:09pm
Depends a bit on what you sail and local conditions...
If you sail something like a laser, you'll be getting lots of spray; something like a Tideway, and you'll stay dry.

Winter conditions usually have more wind (less tree leaves) and much cloder water.

I found that a drysuit works well - for deep winter thermal underwear, thermal shirt and longjohns, thermalsocks, "onesie fleece, then the drysuit, thermal balaclava and winter sailing gloves. Kept me warm enough when one of our trainee instructors was doing capsize practice just after our lake thawed!

Obviously, as the weather warms up, reduce the layers.
It is bulkier than a wetsuit, but I found that a wetsuit tries to impose its shape on you (and it shrinks around the waist).

The other advantage of the drysuit is that I'll arrive dressed in the correct layers, then only need to climb into the drysuit in the changing room. After sailing, rinse drysuit, remove, go home and air the wetsuit. Definite advantage if the changing facilites are cold.

Having used a drysuit, I wouldn't want to go back to a wetsuit for winter.

Colin

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Post Options Post Options   Quote Tynesider Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Nov 17 at 9:18pm
Cheers Colin good advice, I sail a Hartley 12 and yes often capsize as like many lakes winds they can be strong and changeable with gusts.

I see many dry suits at various prices which is also a bit confusing do you find some makes are better than others and do you simply 'gets what you pay for' and at 72 year old I definitely would want a front entry zip

Edited by Tynesider - 13 Nov 17 at 9:18pm
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Eisvogel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Nov 17 at 8:54am
I would also go for one with attached latex socks. I didn't, and as a consequence I get wet feet which is really cold, and during launching water gets in through the ankle seal, so I have some water trapped in the legs. Also means I cannot wear woolly socks. 
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Sam.Spoons Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Nov 17 at 8:59am
Answered your post on facebook Mike but new question above. I bought a Typhoon Ezedon drysuit this time last year and the plastic zip is a lot easier to use than a standard rubber and metal drysuit zip. I'm not as flexible as I was so it being easy to get on and off is a major plus. I've only worn it a dozen times so can't comment on durability but it appears well made. The Goretex socks work well too.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Jack Sparrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Nov 17 at 4:22pm
Drysuits - can't go wrong with: TridentUK

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Post Options Post Options   Quote Do Different Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Nov 17 at 5:14pm
+1 ✔️ for Trident. 7yrs.

Good price, good range sizes and for a small supplement will even do made to measure. Their diagonal front zip is particularly well designed as it extends well below the waistband so allowing an easy comfort break without disrobing.

I don't wear a drysuit regularly so cannot comment on longevity of the plastic zip but it has worked very well so far. 
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Wiclif Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Nov 17 at 6:58pm
The plastic zips have had a bad press in some quarters, I suspect that the problem is when the zips are doubled over and then get squashed, for example when trying to squeeze another bag into the boot of the car.

And never ever leave the dry suit in the hot press, the seals donít like it.

I find that you seem to create your own micro climate inside a dry suit. It is just so much warmer than a set of oilskins. I found that a one piece suit is all you need for sea sailing, and I would suggest a pair of Rooster Poly Pro socks on top of the dry suit socks. They are slightly slippery and make it so much easier to get your footwear on.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote piglet Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Nov 17 at 8:27pm
I'm sure it must get colder 'oop north'
But here in the soft south I do the jan/feb series in my 3mm Code Zero.
I bolster it up with 2 layers thermal rashie, a 1mm titanium lined and the old Aquafleece.
Putting the boayancy aid INSIDE the Aquafleece makes a big difference.
Also I reckon it's all about the extremeties, boots a size bigger to take the extra socks, a good hat that will stay on and gloves, well, I could write a book on gloves!
I sail a 200, we avoid tipping it in at all costs! But it happens.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote davidyacht Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Nov 17 at 9:45pm
Bit of a fan of a blind stitched and taped long john, a decent taped and sealed dinghy top and layers of fast dry thermal tops, pretty adaptable for all weathers and gives you some protection against knocks in the boat.  

I must admit I am not a fan of dry suit seals particularly when I get a bristle rash around my neck.  

I use Zhik long johns, but I think Rooster have a blind stitched long john that is cheaper, and my Gill Pro Top is giving excellent service.
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