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Enterprise sail advice please

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Solitaireblue View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Solitaireblue Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Apr 13 at 9:14pm

Many thanks for all the advice and info. Its given me quite a few options and ideas to explore.

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Post Options Post Options   Quote craiggo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Apr 13 at 9:24pm
I tried to post something from my tablet but the battery ran out mid-post.

I think Al is correct, up until the late 80s it was pretty common to see boats reefing in anything over a F4. Typically we'd roll the mainsail around the boom with a strop on the end of the kicker which we rolled up in the sail. This was possible mainly because boats tended to be aft sheeted. (Its difficult to roll a mainsail around the boom when the mainsheet attaches to middle of the boom).

Since the 80s rig controls have massively improved mainly in the ropes available and the size of high quality blocks reducing. This has enabled sail shape to be controlled far more than in the past.

Unfortunately many non-racers assume that all the string in most racing dinghies is complicated and uneccessary however, in the majority of classes they still only really have a kicker, cunningham and outhaul it is just that they are led to suitable places in the boat and have systems to take up the slack. Many non-racers would gain massively from using the same systems as it would make for far more comfortable sailing.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Solitaireblue Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Apr 13 at 9:50pm
Originally posted by craiggo

Unfortunately many non-racers assume that all the string in most racing dinghies is complicated and uneccessary however, in the majority of classes they still only really have a kicker, cunningham and outhaul it is just that they are led to suitable places in the boat and have systems to take up the slack. Many non-racers would gain massively from using the same systems as it would make for far more comfortable sailing.


Yes, the Enterprise I have bought was used for single handed racing and has lines running back to control Kicker, cunningham and outhaul etc etc without need for a crew. Im glad you have mentioned this as some ppl have advised me to clear out all of this and go back to simple basics. Not keen to do this if the system may benefit me in every day sailing too. I have read on this site about adjustments to all of these whilst sailing to get the most out of the boat but not exactly sure the procedure to use to help if I become overpowered somewhat.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote craiggo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Apr 13 at 10:19pm
Was the boat really raced singlehanded?
Controls led aft to the helm are typical, they are not a singlehanded thing! Generally the crew will play the jib but the helm can feel the balance of the boat through the rudder and through his backside and therefore adjust the sail controls to ensure the boat is balanced and driving smoothly.

In simple terms the kicker is used to keep the boom level, so that when you ease the mainsheet the boom doesn't move vertically. Generally pull it on hard upwind so that if you ease the mainsheet you dont get a huge loss of power and loads of drag, instead you get a gradual loss of power and it also takes some of the load off of the mainsheet.
The cunningham was historically lightly used and often set for the days conditions, but is a really useful control. Pulling it on hard pulls the draft of the sail fwds and by bending the mast it tends to flatten the mid & upper sail depowering these areas.
The outhaul controls the depth of the sail. In zephyr light winds it pays to have it tight so that flow can attach to the sail. When the wind starts getting heavy it should also be pulled in tight as this flattens and de-powers the foot of the sail.

Theres more detail out there but these basic principles should get you started.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Solitaireblue Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Apr 13 at 10:41pm
Originally posted by craiggo

Was the boat really raced singlehanded?
Controls led aft to the helm are typical, they are not a singlehanded thing! Generally the crew will play the jib but the helm can feel the balance of the boat through the rudder and through his backside and therefore adjust the sail controls to ensure the boat is balanced and driving smoothly.

Thanks for your time in explaining things clearly, helps considerably.  The guy I bought the boat from said it had been raced single handed by the previous owner who refurbished it completely so assumed it was to help him in racing. The lines run back to the thwarts about halfway back so I guess it could be used by crew as well. I just assumed as the controls were all within reach of the helmsman it was mainly for single handed sailing. My last Enterprise was very old and very basic so seeing how this boat is laid out with lines and pulleys everywhere confused me at first! 




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Post Options Post Options   Quote jeffers Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Apr 13 at 8:56am
Most of the Ents I have seen have their control lines rigged back to the thwart so this is probably the current way of doing things.

The control they do not seem to use (or even attach) is the cunningham.
Paul
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Solitaireblue Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Apr 13 at 9:15am
Originally posted by jeffers

Most of the Ents I have seen have their control lines rigged back to the thwart so this is probably the current way of doing things.

The control they do not seem to use (or even attach) is the cunningham.


Thanks for the info. Nice to know its probably the current way of doing things. I will leave in place and use instead of stripping out and going back to basics. I was advised to not do too much adjusting of both Kicker and cunningham whilst sailing as one might cancel out the other if not done correctly. Just want to use boat for cruising really so fine tuning for getting more speed etc wont be necessary.

Cheers
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Post Options Post Options   Quote SamM Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Apr 13 at 9:32am
I still use the control lines when I'm cruising. They're pretty important for retaining control of the boat and helping you sail it more easily. In simple terms, use the cunningham upwind when you're getting overpowered (the more overpowered you are, the more you pull on). For the kicker a simple rule of thumb is to keep the top batten tell tale on the main streaming for about half of the time. Upwind, the windier it is, the more you'll pull on. This takes power out of the rig and sail in more control. Downwind you need to let it off a bit otherwise your boom will hit the water too easily (boom & water combination = swim). If you let it off too much on a dead run you might find the boat death roles, but if you keep checking your top tell tale every now and then you won't go too far wrong.

I certainly wouldn't have wanted to be without my control lines when sailing down Loch Ness in 20 knots of breeze with my camping kit on board and no safety cover around!


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Post Options Post Options   Quote Solitaireblue Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Apr 13 at 9:46am
Originally posted by SamM

I still use the control lines when I'm cruising. They're pretty important for retaining control of the boat and helping you sail it more easily. In simple terms, use the cunningham upwind when you're getting overpowered (the more overpowered you are, the more you pull on). For the kicker a simple rule of thumb is to keep the top batten tell tale on the main streaming for about half of the time. Upwind, the windier it is, the more you'll pull on. This takes power out of the rig and sail in more control. Downwind you need to let it off a bit otherwise your boom will hit the water too easily (boom & water combination = swim). If you let it off too much on a dead run you might find the boat death roles, but if you keep checking your top tell tale every now and then you won't go too far wrong.

I certainly wouldn't have wanted to be without my control lines when sailing down Loch Ness in 20 knots of breeze with my camping kit on board and no safety cover around!



Thanks. This helps me no end. I have been searching the net for some time for advice on using both kicker and cunningham etc usefully and yours and Jeffers advice has answered my queries perfectly. Much appreciated.

Sounds as if you had a great time sailing in Loch Ness I know the area as used to spend time in Scotland camping and climbing; took a boat trip once on the loch impressive scenery.



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Post Options Post Options   Quote MerlinMags Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Apr 13 at 3:51pm
Whether singlehanded or not, a jib is often handy to help manoeverability! Perhaps you fudged a tack and you're really near a moored yacht - quick, back the jib and phew, you're saved.
 
If there are no windows in your sails, a short strop of wire under the jib tack will raise it off the foredeck to aid visibility when you've only got one pair of eyes aboard.


Edited by MerlinMags - 18 Apr 13 at 9:36am
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