New Posts New Posts RSS Feed: 420 vs J22
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Register Register  Login Login

420 vs J22

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  12>
Author
lizzerrslitherr View Drop Down
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: 26 Oct 11
Location: MKE/Denver
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 3
Post Options Post Options   Quote lizzerrslitherr Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: 420 vs J22
    Posted: 26 Oct 11 at 5:45pm
What is the difference between sailing a J22 vs a 420?
I realize that the J22 has a motor, but isn't that just for the sake of convenience?
Back to Top
Mister Nick View Drop Down
Far too distracted from work
Far too distracted from work
Avatar

Joined: 01 Aug 09
Location: United Kingdom
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 389
Post Options Post Options   Quote Mister Nick Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Oct 11 at 6:53pm
I think the main difference is the fact that a 420 is a small dinghy and a J22 is a keelboat, meaning that the J22 is a much bigger boat with a much bigger rig.

Edited by Mister Nick - 26 Oct 11 at 7:01pm
Back to Top
themeaningoflife View Drop Down
Far too distracted from work
Far too distracted from work
Avatar

Joined: 06 May 11
Location: Essex/ Kent
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 212
Post Options Post Options   Quote themeaningoflife Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Oct 11 at 7:00pm
+1  Tongue
Cambridge University Lightweight Rowing Club
RS800 1128

kindly sponsored by RWO Marine
Back to Top
lizzerrslitherr View Drop Down
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: 26 Oct 11
Location: MKE/Denver
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 3
Post Options Post Options   Quote lizzerrslitherr Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 Oct 11 at 3:17am
So if I've only ever sailed a 420, what would I need to know about the J22 before sailing it?
Back to Top
bferry View Drop Down
Posting king
Posting king
Avatar

Joined: 01 Jun 09
Location: Malta
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 190
Post Options Post Options   Quote bferry Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 Oct 11 at 7:22am
The J22 is a completely different boat to the 420.  As stated above, the J22 is a keelboat, however the experience gained on a 420 would be of great benefit since the J22 has a similar rig layout.  The most obvious difference is that you cannot launch the boat in the same way as a dinghy and you cannot trailer it back home after every session.  You would need some sort of mooring for the boat.  It is also much heavier than a dinghy, less likely to capsize and includes a v-birth, small galley and heads for cruising.  You can check out more details on the following link:
 
Bernard
Vareo 249
Miracle 2818
Malta
Back to Top
Mister Nick View Drop Down
Far too distracted from work
Far too distracted from work
Avatar

Joined: 01 Aug 09
Location: United Kingdom
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 389
Post Options Post Options   Quote Mister Nick Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 Oct 11 at 1:14pm
Originally posted by lizzerrslitherr

So if I've only ever sailed a 420, what would I need to know about the J22 before sailing it?

You need to bear in mind the draught will be a lot bigger on the J22 so you won't be able to sail into shallow water - if you do, you won't be able to get back out easily because obviously it's not practical to lift the keel up whilst sailing (I don't know if a J22 has a lifting keel or not). Obviously if you hit something it's going to do more damage that a 420 because it's much heavier. The loads on everything will be a bit bigger, which shouldn't be a problem provided you're careful. You also need to consider where you're going to store the boat. I imagine a J22 is trailable as it's pretty small, so you've got the option to lift it out and take it home after each session. Your other options are paying for a swinging mooring (which you will need to learn how to sail onto), or paying for a berth in a marina (some locations will only have one of these available to you depending on where you sail). If you don't want to anti foul the boat then you can dry sail it (meaning that it will be put in the water when you want to use it, lifted out afterwards and stored in the boat yard) although this is a pretty expensive way of doing things and unless you're racing the boat seriously then it isn't really worth it if there are other alternatives available. It's a good idea to go and sail on other peoples keelboats before you buy your own so you can get an idea of the best way to do things. It'll teach you what to do when things go wrong and how to do everything you need to be able to do for yourself on your own boat. There isn't a huge difference between actually sailing a small keelboat and a dinghy, but there are fairly big differences between storage, maintainance etc.
Back to Top
bferry View Drop Down
Posting king
Posting king
Avatar

Joined: 01 Jun 09
Location: Malta
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 190
Post Options Post Options   Quote bferry Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 Oct 11 at 3:55pm

IMO I wouldn’t dream of launching/recovering the boat after every sail.  Its a guaranteed way to ensure that you will not use the boat often and abandon it at a later stage.  A swinging mooring is definitely the better option.  Otherwise just stick to dinghy sailing: less costly, easier to handle and more likely to keep you interested.  Alternatively, go for a larger cruiser/racer with marina berth etc if you can afford the time and money, although the experience would be nothing close to sailing a dinghy with a lightweight planing hull.

Bernard
Vareo 249
Miracle 2818
Malta
Back to Top
alstorer View Drop Down
Really should get out more
Really should get out more
Avatar

Joined: 02 Aug 07
Location: Cambridge
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 2899
Post Options Post Options   Quote alstorer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 Oct 11 at 4:16pm
I'm going to guess that the original poster has merely been asked along to sail on one, rather than thinking of getting one for herself? I think she may be more interested in the actual sailing (crewing?) technique than the nitty gritty of ownership.
-_
Al
Back to Top
ASok View Drop Down
Really should get out more
Really should get out more


Joined: 26 Sep 07
Location: United Kingdom
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 739
Post Options Post Options   Quote ASok Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 Oct 11 at 5:09pm
Originally posted by bferry

IMO I wouldn’t dream of launching/recovering the boat after every sail.  Its a guaranteed way to ensure that you will not use the boat often and abandon it at a later stage.  A swinging mooring is definitely the better option.  Otherwise just stick to dinghy sailing: less costly, easier to handle and more likely to keep you interested.  Alternatively, go for a larger cruiser/racer with marina berth etc if you can afford the time and money, although the experience would be nothing close to sailing a dinghy with a lightweight planing hull.

 
Completely disagree. If you can afford it then dry sailing a small keelboat is the best option. Easier to keep clean and no antifouling. Its no hassle at all.
 
Swinging moorings are actually more of a hassle than they sound. You have to motor or paddle out to get your boat. The outboard won't work, someone stolen your tender, the water taxi is busy taking everyone else up the river etc. etc.
Back to Top
r2d2 View Drop Down
Far too distracted from work
Far too distracted from work


Joined: 29 Sep 11
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 350
Post Options Post Options   Quote r2d2 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 Oct 11 at 5:20pm
420
J22

Edited by r2d2 - 27 Oct 11 at 5:22pm
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  12>

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Bulletin Board Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 9.665y
Copyright ©2001-2010 Web Wiz