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a few question re learning to sail

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dv8i View Drop Down
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    Posted: 21 Apr 09 at 9:12pm
hi, im currently doing up a gp14 dinghy. This summer im hoping to learn to sail at the local yacht club, with my daughters. My questions are,
1. do i use my own dinghy or the clubs, (im not a member )
2. what clothes should we wear ?


cheers Gary
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Garry View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Garry Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Apr 09 at 9:34pm

Hi gary

Assuming you've never sailed before you have 2 options

Take an RYA course, you are aiming for level 2 (or the irish equivalent) or find someone at the club to crew for/teach you.

Your club may well run training courses.

Normally you have to join but some clubs have alternative arrangements (like day sailing etc).  I would not recommend sailing without safety cover if your experience is limited (although you also can't always rely on volunteer safety boat crews).

What to wear - if only sailing in the summer then you should get away with a cheapish wetsuit.  You will need a good spray top though, specialist are best but you can get away with an anorak (but cut off all toggles and string that might catch)  you need something warm on your feet - wetsuit boots or plimsols possibly with thermal socks.  I definately wouldn't recommend bare feet. Don't forget buoyancy aids for everyone, think comfort rather than cheap you don't save much and manouverability in the water is really difficult with some buoyancy aids.

If you have sailing club (that sails dinghies near by) your best bet is to go and have a chat with the members, you'll get generally good advice. Also second hand gear especially for children. 

Expect to get wet from time to time, capsizing is a normal part of sailing.  Having said that the GP is a great boat and of the more stable variety.

wetsuit keeps you warm by trapping a layer of water, which warms up next to your body.  Dry suit, cost much more and keeps you totally dry (except for persperation).  shorts and t shirt seems like a good idea when sunny until you fall in.  Do not wear wellies, jeans and avoid cotton (synthetic jumpers are actually pretty warm if a close fit.

Sailing with kids, depending on age - make sure the're warm, keep sessions short, remember toilet breaks (esp for girls).  should always be fun (no stressy parents even if you are having a disaster).

Alternative which might be cheaper get them to learn through club / school ... and then they teach you.

Hope there are some useful ideas there, have fun.  If you pm your email address I will send back the information I send to parents at BCYC.

check out http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bRRWZ-vPie0 to see Rich and me racing the lark.

Garry

Garry

Lark 2252, Contender 298

www.cuckoos.eclipse.co.uk
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MerlinMags View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote MerlinMags Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 Apr 09 at 2:28pm
Most clubs would want you to be a member in order to launch your own boat, or to borrow a club boat.

There may be a nearby slipway you could launch your own boat from (minimal charge) but only if you knew how to sail and were confident etc.

You could probably do a training course without being a member. It would be well worth it - you can't really teach yourself what to do. If your daughter(s) did the course too that would avoid you trying to teach them (probably imperfectly). Teaching your own family can often end in tears (in include wives in that). Wait until you've got a few years of experience before trying to show anyone else the ropes.

Another way to gradually pick it up is to offer your services as a dinghy crew, to club members. There is usually someone happy to take a novice out, and talk them through it, usually whilst racing.
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dv8i View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote dv8i Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 Apr 09 at 5:07pm

Thankyou all  fro the info,  i'll have a chat to the dinghy guys at the locala yacht club and see what they advise.

 

thanks Gary

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Post Options Post Options   Quote starfishbooks Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Apr 09 at 11:28am
For useful reading try the RYA Go Sailing (ISBN:
9781905104048). It is aimed at kids, but is also very
good for grown up beginners. It is now widely used as
the training manual for beginners and we have had
excellent feedback from instructors.

My mrs is Claudia Myatt, the author, so I have to admit
to an interest. Please excuse me as I'm rather proud of
her.
Perry,

www.starfishbooks.co.uk
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Post Options Post Options   Quote MerlinMags Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Apr 09 at 5:37pm
It's a good book, and the kids enjoy the 'workbook' version too.

Peep at an example page:
http://www.ryatraining.org/assets/webimages/Publications/G32 -p20.jpg
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Post Options Post Options   Quote desteve1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 Apr 09 at 3:23pm
anouther tip is to sail a stable boat to "learn the ropes" and then maybe go on to your gp14 or a clubs
laser 81188 (looking for a name)
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HannahJ View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote HannahJ Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 Apr 09 at 5:14pm
A GP14 is about as stable a training boat you'll get without going for a Wayfarer which is much bigger and heavier! Depends of course whether you have a shiny new one of course, in which case you may wish to borrow a club boat while you make mistakes - although you're less likely to make painful ones (to the boat!) in your own boat!
Good luck, they're lovely boats to learn in and to race
MIRROR 64799 "Dolphin"
The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist hopes it will change; the realist adjusts the sail
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Post Options Post Options   Quote expo09 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 May 09 at 10:49am
It'll depend on the club whether they would prefer you to use your own boat or there's. More likely there's in my (limited) experience.

It would probably be better for you if you can use your own and get used to that.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote laser193713 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 May 09 at 6:52pm

I know at warsash when starting in oppies the "kippers" are allowed to borrow club boats for the first 2 years and then have to provide their own boats, this is good because it filters out the people who arent taking it seriously so the standard of youth sailing remains high, but the volume of sailors may take a hit which is a slight negative side.  Doesnt stop them sailing forever but they would need their own oppy to sail in kippers after 2 years. Then the choice comes to stay in oppies and join the flotilla and start racing on the circuit or to change boats and sail in cadets, they dont race so much but there are some who do.

I did kippers and sailed oppies in the flotilla which for me was the best option but may go and sail with cadets in the 700 because it offers free safety cover

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