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JonnyW View Drop Down
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    Posted: 19 Sep 08 at 9:57pm

In light wind I understand that the kicker should be loose but different sailors offer different opinions on outhaul adjustment should it be tight or should it be loose?

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JimC View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote JimC Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Sep 08 at 10:43pm
It depends how very light the wind is, and also how your sail is cut. If the wind is really really light it won't manage to get round a full sail properly so you try and flatten it off a bit, but that's sub flag flapping coditions really.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote feva sailor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 Sep 08 at 3:19pm

in light winds ihave the outhaul and downhaul on tight to flatten the sail compleatley.

 

also if its boring ligt winds i do stuff like walking around the forestay and so on

 

did it on the feva today, got the bow right at the water level and the transom like a ft off the water

it actually worked quite well but heel it and it turns.

 

in general, if its light winds make it as easy as possible for the ind to flow over the sails. (ie, no bumps and an open leech)

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Post Options Post Options   Quote redback Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 Sep 08 at 5:03pm
Just a little note for beginners. The pressure
developed by the sails is approximately to the square of
the wind speed. So the difference between light and
just a little more can be enormous. For instance 3knots
is a drift but 6knots is 4 times as much power and so
the sail setting would ideally be completely different.
The trouble is when its light its also very variable so
you are not going to be able to adjust for perfection
and even if you could you'd gain a lot more by looking
out of the boat and picking a good shift.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Lukepiewalker Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 Sep 08 at 7:01am
Depends if the water is flat or lumpy as well, generally would ease it a bit if lumpy, crack it in if flat. Wouldn't have the downhaul on at all myself.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote feva sailor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 Sep 08 at 3:57pm

with the downhaul/cunningam they say to pull on it gradually.

id say in no wind at all full on the cunninam but if theres a puff just pull it so there are a few small creases in it, if there is a small gust but not enough for the crew to sit on the windward gunwhale id say a few more creases.

 

in medium winds (when the crew and helm is sitting but not hicking much) id have it lose.

 

in heavy winds back on again

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Post Options Post Options   Quote tmoore Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 Sep 08 at 5:20pm

for the outhaul, the flatter the water the tighter i pull it on. never to the stage where you get creases along the foot of the sail (except in traditional classes with bolt ropes along the booms). in the rougher stuff if im underpowered then i can let the outhaul off so its up to 4/5" off at the deepest point.

i tried loads of downhaul in light in the 300 and it puts huge creses running down the luff of the sail which made it really hard to read. i then let some off, pulled on a little kicker and let the downhaul slightly less until the creases down the luff just went. this seemed fast but i couldnt compare it to other 300 so hard to say for sure. this may be one of the things which only really works in the 300 as its a boat where normal sailing techniques often dont work.

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Post Options Post Options   Quote JonnyW Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Sep 08 at 2:31pm
thanks all will try the suggestions
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Post Options Post Options   Quote KennyR Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Sep 08 at 2:51pm
Depends on the boat.

Two sails. Tight outhaul almost all the time, maybe off
an inch or so in the lumpy stuff if you are
underpowered. Ease it any more with the boom on the
centerline and the leech points up to windward and acts
as an air brake. Not fast. Easing it a bit gives more
weather helm to give the rudder lift and some feel, but
be carefull.
One sail is completely different. To start with the sail
needs to be thought of as a jib and not a mainsail.
Hence the basic shape is different because of that with
the draft much further aft than on a two-sail boat's
mainsail. Therefore you need to sheet down 10degrees or
so from the centerline i.e boom end over quarter roughly
- Look at the way a laser or finn sails upwind. This
means the outhaul can be eased a lot more before the
leech hooks up to windward as it has to 'hook' by 10
degrees or so just to reach parallell with the
centerline of the boat. In some cases this ease will be
several inches with quite a 'bag' in the lower half of
the sail. Whilst sail cut also has an effect, you can
usefully use a lot more outhaul off on a singlehander.
Quite common in Finns to use the outhaul as the primary
'power' control once the boomis on the deck.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote jeffers Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Sep 08 at 6:43pm
Originally posted by KennyR

Depends on the boat.



Exactly....let us know what class you are sailing and better targetted advice will be forthcoming.

I have sailed a variety of classes and they all vary. The Laser for isntance needs a little bit when it is light, the Blaze you just didn't use the kicker until you were stupidly over powered. The 8.1 you need a fair bit at all times to match the mast to the luff curve.

The other (perhaps more important control) in the light is the Outhaul. A lot of people think the lighter it is the less you should use. Not so! In light winds you need to make the path for the flow as easy as possible to prevent it from becoming detached from the sail (not fast or efficient).

In medium airs when are are searching for power you want to loosen the outhaul off so the wind is deflected the maximum amount (this helps generate power) whilst keep the flow attached.

In heavy airs you want to reduce the power so it is back to tightening up the outhaul to help depower the sail (in conjunction with judicious ammounts of cunninham to open the top or 4th corner which is somewhere near the top batten on most sails).

It is all about phyiscs, take a little time to understand what is happening to the air as it flows over the sail (you do not need to be an aerodynamicist) and the whole idea of what you need to do becomes a lot clearer and easier to understand. Putting that all in to practice however it an entirely different matter and takes time on the water and help from more experienced people/instructors.

Just my 2p as always, i am sure someone will explode my outhaul reasonings somewhere along the lines!

Paul
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