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ellistine View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote ellistine Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Asymetric Gybe
    Posted: 22 Aug 08 at 4:03pm

I only started sailing in March so hopefully this qualifies as a beginners question!

I'm after some top tips on how to gybe with the gennaker up. We seem to be able to manage it ok by slowing right down, steering through the turn, bearing off a little as the boom comes across and then start to head up but it's all very sloooow.

I've read that gybes are best carried out at speed but each time we try it we end up too powered and capsize.

Are there ways to depower the kite throught the manouver and should I be sheeting in the main or letting it out as we turn?

Thanks

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Post Options Post Options   Quote alstorer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 Aug 08 at 4:22pm

Gybes are best carried out at speed, but that shouldn't be confused with gybing quickly. You want to carry as much speed into the turn as possible, as this will mean there will be less pressure on the main as it comes across. However, you need to avoid being agressive with the tiller (gybing quickly), as this will cause you to round up into the wind rapidly, powering up both sails, causing you to heel over, turn further and swim.

Otherwise, you want to be doing pretty much what you descibe- steer in slowly, straighten up as the boom comes across, then head up (and speed up) once you're settled. As you get better at this, you can do it quicker.

Depowering the kite:

What I've been taught on the B14, which has a far bigger kite than I've used in the past (I've never really needed to depower whilst gybing on other boats), for heavy weather is this:

1: pick up the psychic signals from the stick waggler that a gybe is imminent

2: take up the slack on the "lazy" sheet (current windward sheet)

3: stick waggler mumbles something. Hike the boat flat as he starts to steer, and haul the "working" (loaded) sheet in as tight as possible.

4: as you cross the boat, keep the kite pinned in. It will now collapse against the jib. This is what you're trying to do, DO NOT PANIC.

5: With the main and jib safely over, and the stick waggler having extricated himself from another fine mess, release the new "lazy" sheet, haul the big sail round the forestay, and off you go.

 

This is where having a way of attaching the kite sheet that minimises catching can be handy. Our current set up has the core exposed at the mid poinnt, and the ends of the outer stiched together, forming a small loop. This goes through the clew, and the ends passed through it. It could be improved by having a short piece of thin line spliced across the "v" that's created. Zip luff or integrated forestay jibs are also important for this.

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ellistine View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote ellistine Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 Aug 08 at 4:40pm

Brilliant! Just the thing I was looking for.

As the stick waggler I will obvioulsy expect the movable ballast up front to do all this without being told so!

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Post Options Post Options   Quote JimC Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 Aug 08 at 5:17pm
Yep. Basically you need to be going as fast as possible as the main flicks/gets flicked across. Once the main is across you should then only round up slowly to give yourselves time to get the lard out over the side etc. Its may be worth "counter steering" as the boom goes across - pulling the tiller towards you so that the boat stops turning, even goes a bit deeper, so that you stay on a run until you've got yourselves sorted out ready to go back to the reach.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote les5269 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 Aug 08 at 5:21pm

Two other things to take into account as the "stick waggler"

Don't let the main go over on it's own as you go across grab the strop/main and pull it over when the boat is half way through the gybe.

The other thing is keep the boat flat, this will make it much easier on the gybe and help keep the speed on too.

Other things to do that will make it easier are, sort out the jib before the gybe so it goes over without backing (you can set it properly when your sorted on the next tack). Keep the spinney sheets tidy in the boat then they wont get caught in the  blocks and back the kite when you don't want it to.

And most importantly talk to your weight in the front, if they don't know what you are doing they wont help!



Edited by les5269
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alstorer View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote alstorer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 Aug 08 at 6:08pm
Originally posted by les5269


And most importantly talk to your weight in the front, if they don't know what you are doing they wont help!


Such good advice. So sadly ignored so often... remember, during most manouvers, if we're looking back to see what the hell you're up to back there, we're doing something wrong as well.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote ellistine Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 Aug 08 at 6:11pm

Originally posted by JimC

. Its may be worth "counter steering" as the boom goes across - pulling the tiller towards you so that the boat stops turning, even goes a bit deeper, so that you stay on a run until you've got yourselves sorted out ready to go back to the reach.

I found this out mucking about on a Pico one night when it was a bit blowey. Certainly helps.

 

Thanks everybody

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Post Options Post Options   Quote gerunamo=] Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 Aug 08 at 6:42pm
the faster you go into a gybe the less wind there is on the other gybe to blow you over.... say if there is 25  knots of wind and you are travelling at 15 knots then there is 10 knotsof wind ready to power your sails up... but if you were traveling at 5 knots then there is 20 knots of wait to blow you over....
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Post Options Post Options   Quote English Dave Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 Aug 08 at 12:37am
I'm going to echo many of the previos comments here.

Go into the gybe as fast as possible. That keeps the apparent wind well forward and so the flick of the mainsail will be as gentle as possible.

In light winds steer a tight course, broaden that as the wind increases.

Swap hands early on the tiller/sheet. Feel for the mainsheet unloading and flick the main across at that point.

As soon as the crew has got the spinni to fill, he/she should release it a lot. Not necessarily dump it but if it's too tightly sheeted then it'll flip you in.

Keep the boat as broad as possible until you are both settled on you new tack. This is a matter of time on the water. As you practice you'll get slicker.

Reverse steer slightly as the boom flicks. That'll keep you broad.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote dopamine Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 Aug 08 at 7:54am
As someone who's gybes vary from sublime to catastrophic I would add:

Try to sheet the main in slightly to bring the falls closer to you and therefore easier to grab, this will also contribute to keeping speed on.  We try to actually pump a bit of extra speed out of the boat before gybing and when it works it is so sweet!

Confidence (or fearlessness) is the key.
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