New Posts New Posts RSS Feed: Solo
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Register Register  Login Login

Solo

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
about a boat View Drop Down
Groupie
Groupie


Joined: 25 Oct 06
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 60
Post Options Post Options   Quote about  a boat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Solo
    Posted: 10 Jun 13 at 1:11pm
So I don not know much about Solo's. Are they good, bad, tactical, forgiving? Etc Any views greatly appreciated.
Back to Top
yellowwelly View Drop Down
Really should get out more
Really should get out more
Avatar

Joined: 24 May 13
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 2003
Post Options Post Options   Quote yellowwelly Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Jun 13 at 1:17pm
If you have other Solos to sail against, they are great.  

If you haven't got others in a fleet, then they're 'not bad', but there's probably a nicer alternative out there.  If you were to give us more details about where you sail, what experience you've had and what you'd expect out of a boat- racing, cruising, maintenance, fitness levels, body weight etc we could recommend the alternatives.
Back to Top
about a boat View Drop Down
Groupie
Groupie


Joined: 25 Oct 06
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 60
Post Options Post Options   Quote about  a boat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Jun 13 at 1:37pm
There is an esblished fleet. Not worried about alternative suggestions. Just wonderred what Solo's are like. The CA webiste seems pretty good. I will give one a go but just wonderred from a longer term perspective what they are like rather than an hours test sail.
Back to Top
yellowwelly View Drop Down
Really should get out more
Really should get out more
Avatar

Joined: 24 May 13
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 2003
Post Options Post Options   Quote yellowwelly Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Jun 13 at 1:52pm
To be honest if there's a fleet then look to the people you'd be joining- will sailing against them be fun?  

Solos:- from my limited experience since Nov:

They are not the most exciting boats from an adrenaline perspective, but the racing is exciting between them, even if naff all wind.

They are certainly cumbersome with the centreboard casing that will require a bit of learned steps before the bruises on your shins disappear.    

You can't square the rig off because the stays get in the way, which means there's limited scope to run by the lee.  However in most wind you will sit on the side downwind, which makes them very forgiving for bad knees and backs. 

The rules are very, very strict.  This is either good or bad depending on your POV, but be under no illusion, they are strict and will stay strict and everyone knows where they stand, including people who will be turned away from events if they cannot present their measurement cert.  I have a measurement cert and signed sail with an ISAF stamp, I would expect if I went to a class association open meeting for everyone else to be in the same position.  

The boats vary- expect to spend 3.5-4k to get a competitive one.... which makes them double the price of a Laser.  Whether they are double the value, is a personal question no one can answer for you.  It is for me.

The rigs are not SMOD one design- this gives some choice and flexibility, but it adds some cost over the 'Laser / Supernova' alternative.  I like this- I sit at the higher end of the weight range and can buy equipment which suits me and enables me to sail to the best of my abilities against guys weighing 70kg doing exactly the same thing at the softer end of the mast chart.

Buy wisely and you won't lose your money.  Despite the proliferation of new designs that may or may not be better, used Lasers and Solos consistently hold their value and depreciate in line with their expendable parts- in other words it's cheap sailing, once you've dealt with the initial outlay.

There's room for a kid in the front.  But it won't give them much to do.  So if you're looking for a versatile boat, it's not the best.  A mirror, feva, graduate or miracle might be better for versatile cruising- one adult, one little kid. 
 


Back to Top
JimC View Drop Down
Really should get out more
Really should get out more
Avatar

Joined: 17 May 04
Location: United Kingdom
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 5412
Post Options Post Options   Quote JimC Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Jun 13 at 1:52pm
They're in the mainstream of the 50s/60s dinghy boom sort of boats really, reasonable all round performance without being sparkling in any respect...

Unusual features include that even though not self draining they come up near enough dry if you right them from in the water rather than standing on the board, which is great if you can climb in over the side, not so great if you can't. They still have lots of water in if you right them from standing on the board though. They have fully battened sails which mean the rags last about 5 times longer than anything with short battens.

By comparison with modern designs they're relatively slower in breeze and not so quick to plane, but they'll hapily distribute clouds of spray about in a bit of breeze and provide entertainment. Notoriously good in light airs/roll tacking conditions.

Old glass fibre ones are ruddy awful and best avoided, but the modern sandwich plastic boats are very good indeed, often better than a good wood one. Might be the best selling singlehander for adults in the UK at the moment, as so many Lasers go to youngsters now, bu certainly second only to Lasers.

People talk a lot about tactical this and so on, but all boats seem to me tactical with different emphases... I personally find the boom horribly low, but quite obviously hundreds of people manage! Its a boat I'm happy about recommending as a first singlehander, the only caveat is getting back in the boat after a capsize esp for shorter folks and those with less upper body strength, and that's something worth trying. As they mostly have transom flaps a good trick if you have trouble getting in is to hang on the back and open a transom flap until the stern sinks enough to let you clamber in.

Edited by JimC - 10 Jun 13 at 1:56pm
Back to Top
about a boat View Drop Down
Groupie
Groupie


Joined: 25 Oct 06
Online Status: Offline
Posts: 60
Post Options Post Options   Quote about  a boat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Jun 13 at 3:37pm
Thanks chaps  - all very informative.

Edited by about a boat - 10 Jun 13 at 3:38pm
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Bulletin Board Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 9.665y
Copyright ©2001-2010 Web Wiz